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Thread: Chocolate blocks and traffic lights

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    Chocolate blocks and traffic lights

    So what are the rules regarding the use of "chocolate blocks" in permanent installations like this?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Certainly explains why they aren't rain-tolerant!

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    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
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    In the "new" SA legislation.... EVERYTHING IS "NON PROSECUTABLE" .... !!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    Looks like someone stole the enclosure. Choc block connectors are pretty much the norm.
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    Full Member markthespark's Avatar
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    I really cannot understand why the EIA dont accept them in distribution boards!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by markthespark View Post
    I really cannot understand why the EIA dont accept them in distribution boards!!
    That is an interesting statement...since when cant you use a chocolate block in a DB?

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    Diamond Member Justloadit's Avatar
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    What I have found, is that chocolate blocs used in CFL light fittings, after a few years of service, the plastic collapses into a powder, exposing the brass ferils and are now dangerous if touched. The disintegration of the plastic is due to the UV light emitted by the CFL, and most of the chocolate blocs being sold today do not have a UV block when manufactured. It could be for this reason, that that they are not recommended in DBs and other electrical installations, which may be exposed to UV light.
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    Full Member markthespark's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=ians;143663]That is an interesting statement...since when cant you use a chocolate block in a DB? Hey Ian this ruling has been around for years now! Just about every compliance inspector will call to have terminal blocks be replaced with ferruled conductors!

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    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
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    Actually the black "chocolate blocks" i have encountered are not SABS or SANS compliant / approved, which, if used in an installation, should be. I have tried without success to obtain a SABS certificate from the suppliers. These stuff (some, if not all) are made in their trillions in china to the lowest quality possible. You sign for such approvals at the back of the coc on Section 5.2

    See:

    SANS 1433-1, Electrical terminals and connectors – Part 1: Terminal blocks
    having screw and screwless terminals.

    SANS 1433-2, Electrical terminals and connectors – Part 2: Flat push-on
    connectors.

    And Table 4.1 Page 55:

    Connectors (terminals)
    Terminal blocks:
    – clamping: ≤ 300 mm2
    – screw type: ≤ 35 mm2

    Flat push-on:
    – 0,75 mm2 to 10 mm2
    – ≤ 300 °C

    SANS 1433-1
    IEC 60998-2-1
    IEC 60998-2-2
    SANS 1433-2

    If the manufacturer can provide SABS approval for such terminal blocks as specified above it certainly can be used.

    BUT, that should not stop anybody as legislation means nothing in this country without efficient enforcement. :-)

    Like the helacon connectors are sabs approved: (up to 2011 for this certification)

    RCC- Helacons.pdf
    Last edited by ACEsterhuizen; 20-Feb-18 at 08:16 AM. Reason: grammar

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    I think a lot of people don't realise there's different choc block connectors for different applications. You get the cheap ones which are usually some sort of polypropylene or even polyethylene, they're the type mentioned above that turn to powder over several years if they're in a warm environment like in a light fitting snuggled next to the ballast.

    You also get Nylon connector blocks that look pretty similar to the cheap polypropylene but they're far less flexible, in fact you can't twist a strip by hand to break them off if they're nylon. The nylon connector blocks don't disintegrate over time because they're rated to 125 degrees celsius and also have higher current carrying capacity because of their temperature rating.

    You get the standard polypropylene and also the Nylon connector blocks where the screw tightens directly onto the wire but there's better connectors available in both materials that have a tongue type wire guard inside them that are supposed to be used for stranded conductors. You also get connector strips that have a full cage type termination inside them similar to the type found in most circuit breakers.
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    I see the wago 222 range are promoting their product is SABS compliant.

    Another one f the the good ol skrewit...apparently was outlawed...yet everyday i see skrewits being used...25 amp welding sockets are another product being purchased and installed in new installations.

    it is simple...if you can buy it at an electrical wholesaler it must be compliant...if not why not...why should it be the electrical contractors responsibility.

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