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Thread: Multifunction Testers

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    Multifunction Testers

    We will receive a K6016 Multifunction tester later today. Kyoritsu.
    Decided to purchase one for testing all the DB'S in the factory that we contract at.
    No coc's for any DB at the moment.
    Reason is I want exact recordings to be taken and downloaded and placed in a file with the COC for each DB.
    So after each DB we can use the RS232 adaptor and use the KEW Reporting software.

    Luckily we have an opportunity to have FULL and PROPER training on the K6016 before we attempt to use it.

    Anyone else have one, any issues.
    Andy, I saw your 2016 post in a search, seems it has a nice digital display and not just leds

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    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
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    Hi there, (not argumentative, just needs some clarification here please )

    This tester (and other electronic testers) does not specify from 4v to 24v, it vaguely refers to "over 6v" on it's datasheet, please clarify this "supply" the regs are referring to when doing this test:

    8.6.2 Continuity of bonding

    Test the continuity of the bonding between the consumer's earth terminal and all exposed conductive parts using a supply that has a no-load d.c. or a.c. voltage of 4 V to 24 V, and a current of at least 0,2 A. In each case, the resistance shall not exceed 0,2 Ω.


    8.6.3 Resistance of earth continuity conductor

    Use a resistance meter to measure the resistance of the earth continuity conductors between the consumer's earth terminal and the earthing terminals of all points of consumption and switches. The values shall not exceed those given in table 8.1.




    Why am i saying this? Because you do this test with and old fashioned hand crank megger on the ohms scale and do the same test with this type electronic meter you get 2 different ohm readings. Why. Ohms is Ohms. I have tested this. And i am talking 5 Ohms versus 0.1 Ohms with the megger. All leads were zeroed in both tests. The difference between issuing a valid CoC and a CoC which is not valid.

    i have tested the volts these electronic testers puts out, and the one i used does not come close to 24V, it measured 7v supply on the outleads, which is not what regs specifies the supply must be. (4v TO 24v)

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    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
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    I have always believed that to be the minimum and maximum test voltage range acceptable to do the tests.

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    ACEsterhuizen (29-Jan-18)

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACEsterhuizen View Post
    i have tested the volts these electronic testers puts out, and the one i used does not come close to 24V, it measured 7v supply on the outleads, which is not what regs specifies the supply must be. (4v TO 24v)
    7 Volts is quite clearly within the range of 4 Volts to 24 Volts.

    Looking around, it seems 100 Volts tends to be the starting point of hand-cranked meggers - which is clearly out of range.

    The reason for the difference in readings is the higher voltage will overcome and reduce the resistance in marginal connection points.

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    ACEsterhuizen (29-Jan-18)

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACEsterhuizen View Post
    ......Because you do this test with and old fashioned hand crank megger on the ohms scale and do the same test with this type electronic meter you get 2 different ohm readings.
    When you say 'hand cranked megger' are you referring to one of the old bakolite series 3 type testers or a more modern one like the MJ160?

    I wouldn't suggest using any tester that's designed primarily as an insulation tester for low resistance tests / earth impedance. You need a tester that uses low voltage and relatively high current. The test voltage and current ranges specified in the regs just rules out most multimeters, clamp meters and insulation testers from being suitable for these tests.
    _______________________________________________

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    ACEsterhuizen (29-Jan-18)

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