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Thread: Connecting gas stoves

  1. #21
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    just to blow everything out the water. You cannot use only 1 x 9 kg bottle for a domestic stove as indicated in the table below:


    Table 2 ^ Container requirements of typical appliances
    1 2 3 4 5
    Approximate number of containers
    required
    Capacity of container
    Approximate
    input Appliance
    22 L (9 kg) 45 L (19 kg)a 113 L (48 kg) kJ/h
    Gas stove, normal domestic 1,50 0,65 0,32 42 000

    Gas stove, large domestic 2,25 1,00 0,50 63 000
    Hotplate (2 burner) 1,00 0,25 0,12 16 000
    Instantaneous water heater, multipoint 4,60 2,00 1,00 74 000
    Instantaneous water heater, single point 2,00 0,84 0,42 37 000
    Gaslight 0,10 0,04 0,02 2 000
    Gas iron 0,20 0,08 0,04 3 000
    Refrigerator 0,10 0,04 0,02 2 000
    Space heater, large, with flue 2,00 0,84 0,42 37 000
    Space heater, small, portable type 0,40 0,16 0,08 5 000
    NOTE 1 The container requirements may be scaled down if it is unlikely that all appliances will be used
    simultaneously for long periods of time.
    NOTE 2 This table is based on results that are typical for cold-winter conditions in South Africa; in
    warmer conditions the requirements will be less. With experience, a registered installer will learn how
    the values can be modified to suit local conditions.
    a
    It has been found in practice that the approximations given for 45 L (19 kg) containers can usually
    also be used for 34 L (13/14 kg) containers.
    Table 3 ^ Container requirements for an installation
    1 2 3 4
    Number of containers required Appliance
    22 L (9 kg) 45 L (19 kg) 113 L (48 kg)
    Gas stove, normal domestic 1,50 0,65 0,32
    Instantaneous water heater, single point 2,00 0,84 0,42
    Refrigerator 0,10 0,04 0,02
    Gaslights (8 value given in table 2) 0,80 0,32 0,16
    Total number of containers 4,40 1,85 0,9

  2. #22
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    I still cant find the rule which indicates that if the flexible hose is shorter than 1.5 m long a COC is no required.

  3. #23
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    Just been to a property which has a 14 kg bottle positioned directly below a DB with a isolating valve and copper pipe 1 metre long. Was installed and certified by a gas installer. I would have thought that would be illegal because it blocks the access to the DB. You cant move the bottle because there is a short flexible hose just just long enough to reach the shut off valve.

    Time to apply for the gas course to become a certified gas installer

  4. #24
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    A quote to move the DB will have the homeowner quickly contesting the validity of the gas installation certificate. surprisingly though, I had a few cases in Cape Town where people rather paid to have me move their DB as opposed to them moving their stoves from directly below it.

  5. #25
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    Gearing up for some gas-powered cooking? Connecting your new stove doesn't have to be a recipe for stress! Here are some tips to get those flames dancing safely and deliciously:

    Safety First:

    Turn that gas off! Before you even think about tinkering, locate the main gas valve and shut it down tight.
    Double-check your connections. Make sure the gas supply line and your shiny new stove use the same type of fitting. Mismatched threads can turn a simple hookup into a hissy fit.
    Leak? Nope! Use soapy water to check for bubbles around all the connections. Even a tiny whisper of bubbles means there's trouble brewing, so tighten things up or call in the pros.
    Getting Techy:

    Connector chaos? Most stoves come with a flexible gas connector, but if yours doesn't or needs a makeover, find the right one at your local hardware store. Remember, size matters!
    Wrap it up! Apply Teflon tape to the pipe threads for that extra seal of confidence. Just don't be a mummy a few wraps are plenty.
    Go slow and steady. When screwing on those connections, think slow and gentle. Overdoing it can crack the fitting and lead to more leaks than a leaky bucket.
    Light it Up!

    Double-check (again!). Once everything's connected, turn the gas valve back on slowly and listen for any telltale hisses. If you hear anything suspicious, shut it back down and double-check your connections.
    Spark it up! Light the burners according to your stove's manual. If the flames are anything but a healthy blue,

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