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Thread: How to complete a COC/test report

  1. #11
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    Tell me why you suspect the PCSS is a typo, remember we have a TN-S earthing system.

    The lights are fed from the socket outlet to a PEC mounted on the wall, down into a conduit which is trenched from one building to another then up the wall secured to the building, which has a red sleeve over the earth wire, making the all the metal in the surfix live at night.

    I forgot to add the gate wires is a bit dodgy, I am thinking like you, maybe just put a plug top on the gate power and move on, the gate also has pillar lights, but there are no lights, the wires have a connector block and tape, like many would say, its plugged in, not my problem. IT is connected to the ELU.


    Quote Originally Posted by Derlyn View Post
    Two comments.


    1) Your PSCC at main switch reading seems suspect unless its a typo.

    2) Lights on plugs. I see it that the wiring to the lights are not included as the coc covers only up to the point of consumption ( socket outlet ).
    The fact that the lights are a fixture is neither here nor there. If they were on a switch or wired through an isolator or day / night switch then the wiring
    up to the actual fitting will be included in the coc.
    Comments are my opinion, unless regulations are attached to support the comment. This is social media, not a court room.

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    Which reminds me, there are 2 earth spikes on this property, one for the generator and one for the inverter, alternate supplies.

    This is something that might require some discussion.

    The next property that I will be doing a COC, it has 3 earth spike, one below the meter, installed because of the high PSCC, one for the generator and one for the inverter.
    Comments are my opinion, unless regulations are attached to support the comment. This is social media, not a court room.

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    I would like to hear what others feel about things like excluded points plugged into sockets?

    The reason I am sharing the information as I am carrying out the tests is because these are the challenges we all face on a daily basis, and everyone seems to have different views, I would like to hear your view on them, so that we can have open discussion about them to find solution or at least decide what we can agree.

    This is the beauty about this forum, anyone can register and share you opinion.
    Comments are my opinion, unless regulations are attached to support the comment. This is social media, not a court room.

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    578 KA should it not be 0.578 KA?

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    Platinum Member Derlyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isetech View Post
    Tell me why you suspect the PCSS is a typo

    I've yet to see a main switch that can handle over half a million amps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Isetech View Post
    I would like to hear what others feel about things like excluded points plugged into sockets?

    The reason I am sharing the information as I am carrying out the tests is because these are the challenges we all face on a daily basis, and everyone seems to have different views, I would like to hear your view on them, so that we can have open discussion about them to find solution or at least decide what we can agree.
    You have to pay attention to 6.16.1.1, 6.16.1.5, 6.16.1.10, 6.14.1.4 and 6.14.1.6.

    6.16.1.1 Fixed appliances do not form part of the electrical installation other than their positioning in relation to the supply and the wiring carried out between different parts of the appliances.

    6.16.1.5 A socket-outlet shall supply only one fixed appliance. The use of flexible cords of length exceeding 3 m is not recommended. The reason for this recommendation is an endeavour to ensure operation of the overcurrent protective device. (But see also 6.14.1.4 for luminaires.)

    The requirement that a socket outlet may only supply one fixed appliance is often a killer. Even if we say the security light system is "one fixed appliance", you still have to navigate this:

    6.16.1.10 The wiring between different parts of a fixed appliance that are installed separately is part of the fixed installation, even where it is supplied from a socket-outlet, unless such wiring is less than 3 m in length.

    And let's not forget the balance of requirements for luminaires supplied via socket outlets -

    6.14.1.4 In a lighting circuit, a luminaire that is in a false ceiling or in a roof space 4 m above the floor where there is no ceiling, or in a floor cavity, or in a wall cavity, or in a similar position, may be fed from a socket-outlet which may be unswitched and not protected by earth leakage protection, provided that the socket-outlet
    a) complies with SANS 164-3 or SANS 164-2-1 (PD-D type),
    b) supplies one luminaire only, not exceeding the rating of the socket-outlet,
    c) is accessible for maintenance purposes, and
    d) is within 3 m of the luminaire that it supplies.

    6.14.1.6 In a lighting circuit, a luminaire may be fed from a socket-outlet on a wall (that may be unswitched), provided that the socket-outlet
    a) complies with SANS 164-3 or SANS 164-2-1 (partially dedicated socket-outlet),
    b) is protected by earth leakage protection, except in the case where SANS 164-2-1 (partially dedicated socket-outlet) socket outlets are fitted,
    c) supplies one luminaire only, not exceeding the rating of the socket-outlet,
    and
    d) is within 3 m of the luminaire that it supplies.

    At least one 16 A socket-outlet that complies with the requirements of 6.15.1.1 shall be installed in the same room.

    For that last point, perhaps a discussion point is whether the socket outlet is switched at the socket outlet, or at a location away from the socket outlet.
    (Essentially, at what point does a circuit become a "lighting circuit").

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    Platinum Member Derlyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isetech View Post

    I forgot to add the gate wires is a bit dodgy, I am thinking like you, maybe just put a plug top on the gate power and move on
    Nope, that's not how I think. That's a no-no. I think SANS 10142.
    The regulations say that plugged in leads to fixed appliances ( the gate motor is a fixed appliance) should not be longer than 3 meters so if the gate motor is further than 3 meters away from the socket outlet, I would definately not be thinking of just fitting a plugtop to it's supply. That's a false assumption.

    As far as the lights are concerned, they are called luminaires in the code. Correct me if I'm wrong, but according to 6.16.1.3, a luminaire is only regarded as a fixed appliance when either a fan or heater is incorporated in the unit. The regs regarding fixed appliances therefore do not apply to luminaires that do not incorporate either a fan or heater.l

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    Platinum Member Derlyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    (Essentially, at what point does a circuit become a "lighting circuit").
    Interesting discussion.

    My understanding is that a circuit is either a lighting circuit or not when it leaves the DB, labelled as such.
    Luminaires that are plugged into a socket outlet which is fed from a plug circuit at the DB, are therefore not on a lighting circuit.

    That's my understanding, but let's hear from the other toppies.

    This is important as all the regulations from 6.14.1.4 onwards start with " In a lighting circuit".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derlyn View Post
    As far as the lights are concerned, they are called luminaires in the code. Correct me if I'm wrong, but according to 6.16.1.3, a luminaire is only regarded as a fixed appliance when either a fan or heater is incorporated in the unit.


    I have always seen luminaires as a particular category of fixed appliance. But this wording combination of the parts I have bolded below presents something of a contradiction.

    6.16.1.2 The power supply to every fixed appliance, except luminaires, shall be supplied through
    a) a disconnecting device that disconnects both live conductors in a single-phase supply and all phase conductors in a multiphase supply, or
    b) a socket-outlet that is directly accessible at all times that any person is exposed to such appliance while the supply is on. In the case of a remotely installed appliance, the position of the disconnecting device shall be indicated by means of a notice in close proximity to or on the appliance.

    6.16.1.3 Where a fan or heater is included in a luminaire, the luminaire is regarded as a fixed appliance. If the luminaire circuit is protected by an earth leakage protection device that has a rated earth leakage tripping current (rated residual current) IΔn not exceeding 30 mA, a disconnector is not required (see 6.9.3.1).

  10. #20
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    It is good to see some are paying attention, it is suppose to be 578 A.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derlyn View Post
    I've yet to see a main switch that can handle over half a million amps.
    Last edited by Isetech; 13-Jun-24 at 05:25 PM.
    Comments are my opinion, unless regulations are attached to support the comment. This is social media, not a court room.

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