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Thread: COC for PV installation

  1. #11
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    The "point of supply "definition is in the regulations

    I am going to start at the beginning - I have listed definitions of what I see as relevant - Definitions , in red, are from the OHSA , Electrical Installation regulations 2009 ( the definitions are copied from the regulations and not my making )
    The OHSA is what gives SANS 10142-1 teeth

    electrical installation means any machinery, in or on any premises, used for the transmission of electricity from a point of control to a point of consumption anywhere on the premises, including any article forming part of such an electrical installation irrespective of whether or not it is part of the electrical circuit, but excluding
    (a)
    any machinery of the supplier related to the supply of electricity on the premises;
    (b)
    any machinery which transmits electrical energy in communication, control circuits, television or radio circuits;

    point of control means the point at which an electrical installation on or in any premises can be switched off by a user or lessor from the electricity supplied from the point of supply, or the point at which a particular part of an electrical installation on or in any premises can be switched off where different users occupy different portions of such premises;

    point of supply means the point at which electricity is supplied to any premises by a supplier;

    supplier in relation to a particular electrical installation, means any person who supplies or contracts or agrees to supply electricity to that electrical installation;


    One relevant part of the electrical installation definition is - including any article forming part of such an electrical installation irrespective of whether or not it is part of the electrical circuit,
    This allows us as Electrical contractors to be in charge of installing cable trays , conduits etc and is relevant to the PV installations as well

    Moving onto SANS 10142-1 - We start at the scope covered - Again regulations copied are in red , not mine

    1.2 Aspects covered by this part of SANS 10142
    This part of SANS 10142 covers
    a) circuits supplied at nominal voltages up to and including 1 000 V a.c. or
    1 500 V d.c. The standard frequency for a.c. is 50 Hz. The use of other
    frequencies for special purposes is not excluded,
    b) circuits, other than the internal wiring of apparatus, that operate at
    voltages exceeding 1 000 V and are derived from an installation that has
    a voltage not exceeding 1 000 V a.c.,
    c) any wiring systems and cables not specifically covered by the standards
    for appliances,
    d) all consumer installations external to buildings,
    e) fixed wiring in the power supply circuits for telecommunication equipment,
    signalling equipment, control equipment and the like (excluding internal
    wiring of apparatus),
    f) the extension or alteration of the installation and also parts of the existing
    installation affected by the existing extension or alteration,
    g) fixed wiring needed to connect the various units of complex machinery
    that are installed in separate locations,
    h) equipment for which no standard is referenced ,
    i) replacement or maintenance of components, and
    j) earthing arrangements.


    If we are going to refer to PV installations as machinery I would hazard a guess and say that PV is complex as describe in g above - So I would think it is covered under the scope

    Moving onto Normative references - regulations copied are in Red and not mine - I have been selective to what I see as relevant
    2 Normative references
    The following referenced documents, in whole or in part, are normatively
    referenced in this document and are indispensable for its application.
    For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated
    references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any
    amendments) applies. Information on currently valid national and
    international standards can be obtained from the SABS Standards
    Division.

    IEC 62116, Utility-interconnected photovoltaic inverters – Test procedure of
    islanding prevention measures.

    SANS 60364-7-712/IEC 60364-7-712, Electrical installations of buildings –
    Part 7-712: Requirements for special installations or locations – Solar
    photovoltaic (PV) power supply systems.

    SANS 61215/IEC 61215, Crystalline silicon terrestrial photovoltaic (PV)
    modules – Design qualification and type approval.

    SANS 61646, Thin-film terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules – Design
    qualification and type approval.


    As can be seen from the above SANS workgroup have used PV related documents to compile SANS 10142-1

    The definitions in SANS 10142-1 that I see as relevant - regulations copied are in Red and not mine

    3.33
    electrical installation
    machinery, in or on any premises, that is used for the transmission of
    electrical energy from a point of control (see 3.56) to a point of
    consumption (see 3.55) anywhere on the premises, including any article
    that forms part of such an installation, irrespective of whether or not it is part
    of the electrical circuit, but excluding
    a) any machinery of the supplier that is related to the supply of electricity on
    the premises,
    b) any machinery that is used for the transmission of electricity of which the
    voltage does not exceed 50 V, where such electricity is not derived from
    the main supply of a supplier, and
    c) any machinery that transmits electrical energy in telecommunication,
    television or radio circuits

    3.9
    Certificate of Compliance
    CoC
    certificate that is issued by a registered person in respect of an electrical
    installation or part of an electrical installation

    3.56
    point of control
    point at which a consumer can, on or in any premises, switch off the
    electrical installation from the electricity supplied from the point of supply

    3.58
    point of supply
    point at which a supplier supplies electricity to any premises

    From the above definitions it would appear that the machinery (PV installation ) is being used for the transmission of electrical energy after the point of control

    Now I get my COC form out and low and behold in section 2 - Installation it ask's me about alternative supplies and references me to 7.12 page 244

    Is alternative power supply installed? (See 7.12):  Yes  No


    7.12 Alternative supplies
    NOTE Alternative supplies include but are not limited to low-voltage generating sets,
    photovoltaic (PV) installations, gas generators, diesel generators, wind turbines and
    hydropower plant.

    7.12.1.1 Subclause 7.12 applies to an installation that incorporates
    alternative supplies intended to supply, either continuously or occasionally,
    all or part of the installation with the following supply arrangements:
    a) supply to an installation or part of an installation which is not connected to
    the main supply of a supplier;
    b) supply to an installation or part of an installation as an alternative to the
    main supply of a supplier; and
    c) appropriate combinations of the above


    Having a look at 7.12 it references in particular PV installations and then verifies that even if it feds only part of the installation it is still relevant

    7.12.1.2 Subclause 7.12 covers, but is not limited to, the following
    a) alternate supply that consist of a combination of an internal combustion
    engine or a turbine, hydro plant, wind energy recovery installation or any
    similar source of mechanical energy and an alternator or a d.c. generator;
    b) rotary UPS (uninterruptible power supply) systems that consist of a
    combination of an electric motor and an alternator, with batteries as a
    standby power source for the electric motor, or with an internal
    combustion engine, gas or turbine as a standby power source for the
    alternator; and
    c) static UPS systems that consist of static inverters with batteries as the
    standby power source (with or without bypass facilities).
    d) installations similar to those in 7.12.1.2(c), but sourcing energy from
    photovoltaics or other sources.


    Again 7.12.1.2 d references in particular PV systems
    They then continue to reference in broad terms to various regulations that need to be complied to for alternative supply's - Their is then a section for additional requirements for PV in 7.12.4

    7.12.4 Additional requirements for installations that incorporate
    electrical supply derived from static inverters used with uninterruptible
    power supply (UPS) equipment and photovoltaic installations off-grid
    or on-grid


    Further on there is another reference to PV and the requirements for color coding on the DC terminals
    7.12.5.2 DC conductors and battery protection methods
    Colour coding for AC/DC solar/photovoltaic installations shall be in
    accordance with the requirements given in 6.3.3.3.
    NOTE DC circuits may be identified by means of colours or symbols.



    7.12.7 Additional requirements for photovoltaic (PV) and similar
    installations that provide a supply as an alternative to the main supply
    7.12.7.1 The photovoltaic installation shall comply with SANS 60364-7-712
    and the solar panels shall comply with SANS 61215 (for poly and mono
    crystalline) or SANS 61646 (for thin-film).
    7.12.7.2 The DC component of the installation shall comply with 7.15.
    7.12.7.3 The rated voltage of each circuit shall be clearly indicated at all
    ends of the circuit.
    In the case of combined circuits, every circuit shall be easily identifiable.
    Where single core conductors are used, such conductors for each circuit
    shall be tied together at intervals to ensure identification, unless another
    suitable arrangement is employed.
    7.12.7.4 Precautions regarding parallel operation as prescribed in 7.12.6.1,
    and overcurrent protection as prescribed in 7.12.4.1 shall be provided.
    7.12.7.5 In addition it shall be recognised that the supply from each inverter,
    battery arrangement and PV panel (or identified clustered group), constitutes
    a supply, and requires arrangements similar to point of supply, which shall
    include switch-disconnection arrangements and shall comply with 7.12.5.
    7.12.7.6 If applicable, all exposed conductive parts may require earthing as
    prescribed in 6.12.3.


    In the above they reference to PV being similar to a point of supply - similar being the operative wording
    They also reference to PV systems complying to 7.15 DC Installations

    I find it difficult that after all the referencing to PV systems in the code that anybody would say that PV systems are excluded - The COC asks if there is an alternative supply and then tells you were to look and what to do - When you sign Section 3 , Inspections and tests you are signing to say that you have followed the regulations which include numerous references to PV

    Am I still misunderstanding something

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    ACEsterhuizen (10-Oct-18)

  3. #12
    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
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    Thank you. I seems I am wrong. I stand corrected for now.

    I am still confused why an INSTALLATION is defined from the point of control to the point of consumption. It should then read from the point of supply.

    I will write the Chief Inspector to clear that up for me. His answer will give closure. The definition of "Installation" should then be from the point of supply to the point of consumption.

    You quoted the reg:

    7.12.7.5 In addition it shall be recognised that the supply from each inverter,
    battery arrangement and PV panel (or identified clustered group), constitutes
    a supply
    , and requires arrangements similar to point of supply, which shall
    include switch-disconnection arrangements and shall comply with 7.12.5.

    and:

    3.33
    electrical installation
    machinery, in or on any premises, that is used for the transmission of
    electrical energy from a point of control (see 3.56) to a point of
    consumption (see 3.55) anywhere on the premises, including any article
    that forms part of such an installation, irrespective of whether or not it is part
    of the electrical circuit, but excluding
    a) any machinery of the supplier that is related to the supply of electricity on
    the premises,
    b) any machinery that is used for the transmission of electricity of which the
    voltage does not exceed 50 V,
    where such electricity is not derived from
    the main supply of a supplier, and
    c) any machinery that transmits electrical energy in telecommunication,
    television or radio circuits


    7.16.1 General
    The distribution system is that part of the installation between the point of
    control connected to the point of supply where electricity is supplied by the
    supply authority,
    and the point of control of any particular electrical
    installation connected thereto, whether it is a specific user or a communal
    installation, where the user of that particular installation can switch it off.

    3.56
    point of control


    point at which a consumer can, on or in any premises, switch off the
    electrical installation from the electricity supplied from the point of supply

    The inverter, battery arrangement and PV panel (or identified clustered group), constitutes a supply.

    "Disputes

    10. (1) Should a dispute arise over the interpretation of a health and safety standard referred to in regulation 5(1) between a user, a registered person, an electrical contractor, an approved inspection authority for electrical installations or a supplier, as the case may be, an affected person may appeal against that interpretation to the chief inspector.
    (2)
    A person who refers a dispute referred to in subregulation (1) shall serve a notice of dispute, setting out fully the nature and grounds of the dispute, on both the chief inspector and the person whose interpretation he or she is disputing, by personally delivering the notice of dispute or sending it by registered post.
    (3)
    The person whose interpretation is disputed shall within 14 working days of the date on which he or she received the notice of dispute, forward a notice setting out the reasons for his or her interpretation to the chief inspector.
    (4)
    The chief inspector shall, after having considered the grounds and the cause of the dispute, confirm, set aside or vary the interpretation of the safety standard in question or substitute it for the interpretation, which in the opinion of the chief inspector, ought to have been given."

  4. #13
    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
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    And thank you, it sure was an interesting discussion. Pushing 60 and still learning. The ambiguity is also having a field day with my OCD.

    Have a good day.

  5. #14
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    Discussion and difference of opinion is always good as it forces all sides to relook and rethink the topic
    Never understood why they made the SANS10142-1 cover Black - The old cover that was Grey was appropriate
    I find the more I read it the more doubts I have

    Point of supply vs. Point of control is easier to explain in an example .

    We are presently doing a small shopping centre and taking a 500Kva supply 400V from Eskom.
    Eskom have there main CB and KWH meter in a kiosk with Eskom locks and fence and more locks
    We have to run the cable from the kiosk to the Centre's main LV panel
    The point of supply is not readily accessible for us to carry out a COC test at - and so the incoming mains CB in our LV panel will be the point of control at which we can legally carry out and sign off on ( the regs are written so that we are still responsible for cable sizing and faults between point of supply and point of control) .

    Eskom is the supplier and the Centre management is the consumer .

    We now run cables from main LV to individual shops and stop in a surface DB with an Isolator.
    Along comes the tenant and appoints a contractor to install electrical in her Biltong shop.
    The contractor will not have access to the main LV room and so the regulations allow him to use the isolator as point of control and sign the COC accordingly
    The actual point of supply is Eskom and if he had to sign a COC from point of supply he would need to check the Centre's DB
    Take a big shopping centre , there could be 5 or 6 LV panels and a transformer before he gets to point of supply which will be MV

    For the Biltong shop the Centre management is effectively the supplier even though they are also the consumer in Eskom's eyes and depending where you are testing as a contractor

    Is the reason that the regulations are written in such a way that shopping centres even though they are the supplier still need to adhere to the regulations.- Comes back to the point of a PV system effectively being the supply , but still falling within the point of control , you cant be a supplier and consumer , but realistic you can - No wonder we get confused

  6. #15
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    Recently decided to go grid tied. Was off-grid since 2012, on select circuits.

    Searching around, this thread popped up on Google, being one of the best ones I have read so far, as I have seen quite a few solar companies, been chatting on another forum, picking up the different beliefs (loosely used) between how the regulations are read. Grey manual reference above makes perfect sense.

    So, the question is, from the regulations published, it all boils down to very specifics like only this type of equipment can be used, installed in this specific manner, using these regulation ito panel wire ... the home owner terms of reference.

    For I see this whole thing playing out into the future where more and more electricians are going to get solar trained, which in turn will help drop the prices of getting a system installed, with a CoC, even removing the current requirement of a engineer signing off. On that point. I know of a electrical engineer who charges per array wattage. 2,5kw system costs R2.5k ex, 10kw system R6750 ex. That makes a lot of sense, for getting it signed off.

    But first the CoC, panels and AC side.

    Being in Bellville Cape Town, does anyone know of any suitable qualified person/s here that I can chat to?
    Or can someone help me by telling me the exact requirements, in equipment terms, what must be in place, that they will sign such off, if I share what is in place?
    Or refer me to the right thread if this is not the spot for that, start a specific thread on that?

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    Hi
    At the moment you do not need an engineer to sign off on Solar installations , unless you get to the really big ones that are being dealt with under REIPPP programs .
    At the moment the biggest you can go is 1MV privately and I stand corrected.

    In my opinion the Solar industry has been hijack to some extent by those that see it as a quick buck.

    Some are also quick to say that they regulations, SANS 10142-1 do not cover DC/PV even though the Introduction in the book clearly states that it does (pasted in Red below) .
    There is also misconception that the circuits between panels are control circuits when they are in fact power circuits.

    An Electrical contractor cannot sign off on a job unless he was in general control.

    The whole solar regulation is being looked at again and it has not been decided yet if it will continue forming part of SANS 10142-1 or if a different set of regulations, SANS 10142-3 may be created.

    To me the biggest problem is that the majority of people are not taking into account the various bylaws ( Fire , Structural , Municipal ) when installing and future maintenance.


    Introduction
    In this edition an attempt has been made to move towards the IEC codes:
    extra low voltage (below 50 V) and d.c. applications (up to 1,5 kV) have been
    introduced as new requirements owing to the extensive usage of, and
    increased fire risk that result from, high load currents. This part of
    SANS 10142 does not intend to cover the LV control circuits of machinery or
    system components that are external circuits between separately installed
    parts of the machinery or system components.
    This part of SANS 10142 includes certain provisions which are for
    information and guidance only. These provisions do not use the word "shall"
    and they can be found in the text, in the notes and in the informative
    annexes. Except in tables, notes are always for information only.
    The aim of this part of SANS 10142 is to ensure that people, animals and
    property are protected from hazards that can arise from the operation of an
    electrical installation under both normal and fault conditions. An electrical
    installation has to provide protection against

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GCE View Post
    At the moment you do not need an engineer to sign off on Solar installations ...
    If you connect to the grid, from the docs I read, you have to have a engineer sign it off, after getting a CoC.
    If the inverter is not on the CoCT inverter list you have even more complications. Until SABS starts "approving" stuff again ... but they are not doing it anymore I read somewhere.

    A whole lot of people bought UPS with a MPPT and promptly connected it to their DB boards. This is a huge thing as UPS / Generator to DB board connections have off-the-shelf-stock-standard-regulations. All being flaunted. Therein I think CoCT, forced by NERSA, is acting now. Deadline is 28 Feb 2019 to register all solar systems. It is a HUGE opportunity for existing electricians.

    And this is not only CPT, but JHB, DBN ... all over. Everyone has the regulations in place, or are waiting on CoCT to see what transpires. Jhb the most costly for grid tied as your charges increases substantially if you connecting solar to a DB. CoCT is just the first one to enforce it publicly. If your supply is from Eskom and not a municipality, then a whole new world of challenges opens up. And if your Municipality does not have regs yet, they are coming. NERSA is behind it if you ask me. That minister did not just mention "taxes" and "solar" in that one speech with no long play in mind.

    Only part where a engineer is not required is if you have a off-grid setup. For that you need to submit a wire diagram with the application to "prove" such, electrician enters the fray again. Therein me choosing to go grid-tied, cheaper, in CoCT, and you can use a pre-paid meter. Or, feed back, but that requires a meter change (+-R8500), a daily charge, lower kwh rate and a rebate at Eskom rates, ex VAT and you must not be in credit after 12 months, as it is illegal to sell power. Unless you go big. So for home users, the deck is stacked.

    Quote Originally Posted by GCE View Post
    In my opinion the Solar industry has been hijack to some extent by those that see it as a quick buck.
    The first few quotes I got for off-grid signoff was a flat R10k+ included engineering fees. The R10k+ was based on there are NO DB board fixes required. Some tests are needed as per the form. Took the time to "train" these reputable solar installers that no, you are wrong, off-grid needs no engineer. Obviously they ignored the feedback.

    A registered electrician is wot, R485 ph, give or take. Use the word "solar" in any sentence and it becomes R800 per hour minimum.

    I'm persistent and kept asking for quotes, prices got better, but also more unsure the answers. I have emailed CoCT about the fiasco brewing, it has been noted.


    SANS10142 is being flaunted around quite a bit, like it is used to justify installing new wires, breakers and fuses to give a CoC on the panels, yet I cannot find anything that says clearly "Solar Panel DC CoC".

    It is annoying when one thinks that most of the equipment comes with clear instructions on what fuses to use, what cable sizes and lengths (DC side), voltage drops and temp effects. Solar parts have clearly statet limits, max volts / amps / VA. Ignore that or do not fuse it properly, and their is a matter of smoke being released.


    Quote Originally Posted by GCE View Post
    ... various bylaws ( Fire , Structural , Municipal )
    If your panels are protruding above a certain high above the highest point of ones roof, you have more costs yes. But how was your panels mounted, DIY or using a knowledgeable roof person?
    Municipal regs for CoCT are quite clear. The interpretation thereof has a huge cost factor, which is not right.
    Fire ... have not read one word about how to handle that. If your house is on fire with a roof full of panels and the firefighters arrive. In the USA the regs and parts required is quite clear, and their firefighters are also trained on how to work in and around solar panels. You cannot "switch" a panel of, you short them wires and it can cause impressive results. Solar panels can burn. You can cover them, that will "switch" them off.

    Attached the form for CoCT, to be completed if you want to grid-tie.
    Here is CoCT info: https://savingelectricity.org.za/pv-renewables/
    Other cities have same, or it is pending.

    It makes sense to register all solar systems as it saves taxpayers money to identify who is not following the basic safety standards. Day someone is killed because of a DIY connection, they will throw the book at the person. There is obviously also the "other side" ito potential taxes coming to a future near you - if too many people start to use solar and some gov department decides it is losing income.

  9. #18
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    Here is some more information on some of the regulations I found for JHB, DBN and NERSA.

    Eskom:
    http://www.eskom.co.za/Whatweredoing/Documents/GAU_SMG_ FAQs.pdf
    http://www.eskom.co.za/Whatweredoing...ulletinSPU.pdf

    JHB: https://portal.segensolar.co.za/rese..._Standards.pdf

    Durban: http://www.durban.gov.za/City_Servic...n-Process.aspx

    NERSA: http://www.nersa.org.za/Admin/Docume...s/Consultation Paper-Rules for Registration of SSEG.pdf

    Business Insider: https://www.businessinsider.co.za/dr...istered-2018-5

    If you ask me, this is a golden opportunity for electricians all over South Africa, as they "have" the clients already. Just take that one step further and make the regulations meet the physical side.

  10. #19
    Diamond Member Justloadit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smiley View Post
    Fire ... have not read one word about how to handle that. If your house is on fire with a roof full of panels and the firefighters arrive. In the USA the regs and parts required is quite clear, and their firefighters are also trained on how to work in and around solar panels. You cannot "switch" a panel of, you short them wires and it can cause impressive results. Solar panels can burn. You can cover them, that will "switch" them off.
    In the USA, they are demanding a firman's switch for solar panels. Solar panels do not burn on their own, as they are made from silicon and glass. There have been instances in which a cell fails and can get hot due to the current flowing through it, but this only happens on very large PV systems in which hundreds of amps are being produced by the grid. Arrays should be isolated with diodes from each other when placed in parallel, to prevent this type of failure occurring.

    Arcing, because of the DC during a disconnect under full load, could cause inflammable material close by to catch alight. Correctly installed systems will not be prone to this. Proper earthing is required in the case of lightning.

    However an interesting fact about misunderstandings on solar panels.
    A Solar panel is known as a current source. A grid or a battery is known as a voltage source.

    The difference off each is as follows :-
    Current source. Irrespective of the load, provided it is with in the source voltage supply range will have a constant current from maximum load to a short circuit.
    In other words a PV panel rated at 265W at midday, will provide 8.3A from 30V to 0V(short circuit). Placing a 10A fuse in series with the load, will not protect anything, as the current is constant. Off course the current is directly linked to the amount of solar radiance.

    Voltage Source. Loading a voltage source will attempt to maintain the same voltage irrespective of the load, to the point that the internal impedance of the load will affect the maximum current that the voltage source can supply. This means that as the load impedance goes lower in impedance, the current will increase until something fails, such as a burning cable causing fire, or smoke coming out of your load. To protect against this failure requires an inline fuse or a circuit breaker.

    Connecting mains directly on to a PV panel, will cause immediate destruction of the solar panel, and blow the mains supply fuse or circuit breaker. However properly designed equipment will never allow this situation to occur even under catastrophic failures.
    Victor - Knowledge is a blessing or a curse, your current circumstances make you decide!
    Solar and LED lighting solutions - www.microsolve.co.za

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justloadit View Post
    Solar panels do not burn on their own, as they are made from silicon and glass. There have been instances in which a cell fails and can get hot due to the current flowing through it, but this only happens on very large PV systems ...
    I once touched a solar panel where the diodes where already burnt out. Panel was melting hot.
    On Google there are pictures of panels being destroyed / burning. Maybe it is the roof structure that produces the flames? Therein my incorrect use of "panels can burn". Melt is more accurate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Justloadit View Post
    Proper earthing is required in the case of lightning.
    Question: A electrician and a engineer both mentioned that earthing panels for lighting is not such a good idea, as you are supposed to use the same earth as the DB and that is just another path for some of the lightnings power, before the cable disintegrates, to get into the house. What is your take?

    Quote Originally Posted by Justloadit View Post
    However an interesting fact about misunderstandings on solar panels. A Solar panel is known as a current source. A grid or a battery is known as a voltage source.
    Thank you for that.

    Fuses on PV cables are to protect the wire, in case there is a short of whatever cause, correct? I prefer fuses on Pos and Neg.
    Have had a 10amp fuse installed on the wires to the panels. It burnt out when the panels reached full potential. Had to upgrade to 15amp fuse promptly, as the installer though 10amp is ample on 3 x 310w panels in series. It was a good solar day. :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Justloadit View Post
    Connecting mains directly on to a PV panel, will cause immediate destruction of the solar panel, and blow the mains supply fuse or circuit breaker. However properly designed equipment will never allow this situation to occur even under catastrophic failures.
    I have read somewhere that you get MPPT inverters that are mounted per panel sending 220v down the wires to the central unit, which in turn is grid tied.


    Back to the question I was aiming for: Where do homeowners with grid tied solar systems stand ito of a CoC for the DB install, being AC?
    Is there is CoC needed for the DC side ito panel installs?
    A normal electrician cannot give on, if I read the other posts correctly.

    Batteries are straight forward, you have to have a fuse and a quick disconnect. As I want to be able to move the battery bank, it is on wheels:
    Would Brad Harrison connectors (same as at the Anderson connectors) be acceptable?
    Hands are protected from the spark if you disconnect under load.

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