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Thread: Ferrule compliance

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    Ferrule compliance

    Hi all

    Curious, what is the compliance level on ferrules?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Follow up question:
    Often you have plugs with around 3 or 4 wires all coming into one plug box from various directions.
    Most of the installations I've seen just shove all those wires into the plug so they are sort of joined together.

    And almost all of them are dodgy (to say the least), eg. bad connections or not well fitting.

    What are the options for improving that?
    Can you just solder them together and run a wire from the solder joint that goes into the plug (eg. 4 wires soldered together with a with 5th general purpose wire soldered in that goes into the plug)?

    Or is there some method that is actually reliable?

    Actually generally what is the compliance level of soldered connectors?

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    The ferrules you've shown are bootlace ferrules, they're used for fine stranded wire when you have a screw type termination that's not designed for fine stranded.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gnome View Post
    Often you have plugs with around 3 or 4 wires all coming into one plug box from various directions.
    Most of the installations I've seen just shove all those wires into the plug so they are sort of joined together.
    When you say plugs I'm assuming you mean sockets...Maximum of two wires per termination is allowable.

    If there's too many cables in a socket box to terminate directly into the socket you can use these Hellacon connectors which are designed for solid and starnded conductors http://www.hellermanntyton.co.za/pro...cp-3/911-01806 Wago also do a lever type which is nice.

    Soldering is something we did lots of when I was an apprentice but it's largely gone out of fashion nowadays. I wouldn't recommend manually soldered joints although a soldered joint with heat shrink could be compliant if it's done properly. That said these solder sleeve type connectors are handy, especially for outdoor connections because they're waterproof but they're expensive. They're also no good for joining 3 or 4 wires together behind a socket and obviously they can't be removed and refitted later if you need to test for a fault for example.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    The ferrules you've shown are bootlace ferrules, they're used for fine stranded wire when you have a screw type termination that's not designed for fine stranded.
    Interesting, in your experience is there a ferrule or connector that you prefer to use when wiring plugs or do you prefer just using the raw copper cable?

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    When you say plugs I'm assuming you mean sockets...Maximum of two wires per termination is allowable.
    Indeed I meant sockets.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    If there's too many cables in a socket box to terminate directly into the socket you can use these Hellacon connectors which are designed for solid and starnded conductors http://www.hellermanntyton.co.za/pro...cp-3/911-01806 Wago also do a lever type which is nice.
    Personally I really dislike those.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    Soldering is something we did lots of when I was an apprentice but it's largely gone out of fashion nowadays. I wouldn't recommend manually soldered joints although a soldered joint with heat shrink could be compliant if it's done properly. That said these solder sleeve type connectors are handy, especially for outdoor connections because they're waterproof but they're expensive. They're also no good for joining 3 or 4 wires together behind a socket and obviously they can't be removed and refitted later if you need to test for a fault for example.
    I see, from a testing perspective soldering can be an annoyance.

    Most of the faults I see is around joins. Any temporary connections often seem to lead to situations where wires are either not well connected (high impedance due to bad connection) or alternatively some form of ground fault because wires got damaged from repeated fiddling.

    Thanks for response!

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    There's been lots of previous discussions about connections.

    You could start here https://www.theforumsa.co.za/forums/...ripping/page3?
    or here https://www.theforumsa.co.za/forums/...nking?p=140189
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