Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Down lights, 220v lamps in 12 volt fittings?

  1. #1
    Email problem
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    randburg
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Down lights, 220v lamps in 12 volt fittings?

    So I am just finishing up a little project, refitting a flat I bought and have had an electrician in, checked his licence and saw his regestration papers before hiring. Now what I know of electrical work I learned on line so forgive me but I just want to run this by you guy before i pay this guy and except the Certificate of Compliance.

    I see he has used 12Volt down light fittings with 220Volt lamps? Doesn't sound right to me. I read on the fitting 12V 50 Watt max but he has used a proper 220Volt lamp holder with a proper junction box on it and i see the red and black and the earth going into this connetion box which looks all proper and the cables going to the lamp holder have that heat proof sleeving on them. Does this light need to be earthed? Its out of reach from the floor but wasn't sure if it needed earthing.

    Also in the bath rooms he has used 220V down lights, right above the shower, if i stretch I can touch the fitting? Should these be low voltage or enclcosed in some way?

    Finally, not sure if this an electrical regulation question but the PINK in the loft is really close to the downlights, which are obviously hot, is this right? I mean there is a little space he has cleared around the fitting but i was wondering if there is a certain distance there has to between the down light and the insulation.

    The rest of the job looks fantastic and his guys have done a remarkably neat job of running the cables and the distrubution board looked like a work of art so I'm not to worried just want to clear these little snags before he leaves site.

    Sorry to ask but my usual electrician friend is away and very busy like all good electricians so I thought I'd ask here. Thanks in advance
    Billy bob

  2. #2
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    Are the lamps a bayonet type fitting?

    Is the fitting itself SABS approved and does it have an earth point on it?

    The area above and immediately around the downlights should be clear of all obstacles including pink insulation.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  3. #3
    Email problem
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    randburg
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The lamps are 220 volt 50watt GU10. He has used two kind of light fitting. One is 220 volt fitting with a bracket and a connector on top and earthed and the other one, the ones I'm not sure of are the 12V ones, no transformers, with a 220 volt lamp and holder. They don't have an earth tag but I'm guessing that because your supposed to use a 12Volt lamp in them. This is my problem. I guess the chance of the fitting ever becoming live is so slim and even then its out of reach. So is that permitted under the wiring regulation. Is this compliant. They are Wacco fittings and are sabs approved.

    The lights in the bathroom are earthed kind with the bracket and connector on to but I can reach one of them from the show. Does that need to be low voltage or enclosed? The whole installation is on a earth Leakage.

    I moved all the pink from around the fittings myself.

  4. #4
    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    826
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 110 Times in 88 Posts
    Hi, the rating on the D/L fitting is applicable to the lampholder only.
    In order to legally use the 12V D/L fitting with a 220V lampholder, it would be required to be earthed and a junction box would need to be provided for the joint. The lampholders come with a piece of heat resistant wire, the length of which I am not satisfied with.
    The space from the floor level of the shower upward to a height of "at least 2 500mm" is named "Zone 1". In this area equipment shall have ELCB protection, be so enclosed that "live" parts cannot be touched with a standard test probe and the equipmentmust be be class ll.
    The actual 12V lamp is sometimes shielded with a lens in the front of it.
    All equipment in Zone 1 must also be IPX5 compliant which means it must be protected against low pressure jets of water.

  5. #5
    Email problem
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    randburg
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    So all the bathroom lights, the one a within zomne 1 are going to be changed to 12Volt down lights. Not sure if they are going to be shielded but I couldn't find sheilded anywhere anyway. The transformers are in the ceiling space so you can't touch 220Volt and the main switch is an earth leakage so eveything is covered by it. The 12volt fittings with 220 volt lamps are going to have a proper bracket for 220 volt lamps. The sides of the brackets slot into where the springs which hold the fitting in place go. Does that sound better?

    Thanke for the advice, I like things done properly.

  6. #6
    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    826
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 110 Times in 88 Posts
    The law wants to protect you while you are having a shower. If you upgrade to a very high pressure geyser and some water splashes up to the D/L fitting, is there a chance that some water can reach the connection terminals? Can steam reach the connection terminals? The law says there must be no chance. If there is a chance it is illegal because it is unsafe.Let the guy put in a safe fitting. Your whole family use the shower.
    The "shielded" lamps I am talking about are the ones that are flat in the front. An "open" one does not have the flat piece of glass in the front. You can stick your finger into the opening and touch the tiny "lamp" inside.
    Last edited by Sparks; 07-Jun-11 at 09:13 PM. Reason: omitted last pragraph

  7. #7
    Gold Member Martinco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Rustenburg
    Posts
    927
    Thanks
    175
    Thanked 136 Times in 108 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparks View Post
    The "shielded" lamps I am talking about are the ones that are flat in the front. An "open" one does not have the flat piece of glass in the front. You can stick your finger into the opening and touch the tiny "lamp" inside.
    I have found these to be typically the 20 watt jobs. I have not seen 50 watt lamps with the flat glass shield
    Martin Coetzee
    Supplier of Stainless Steel Band and Buckle and various fastening systems. Steel, Plastic, Galvanized, PET and Poly woven.
    We solve your fastening problems.
    www.straptite.com

    You may never know what results will come from your actions, but if you do nothing, there will be no results... Rudy Malan 05/03/2011

  8. #8
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    The 50mm halogen dichroic lamps with the glass cover shields are available in all wattages including the 50w. Osram, philips, lohuis, GE, etc all make a range with the glass shields.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  9. #9
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,346
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 254 Times in 209 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    The 50mm halogen dichroic lamps with the glass cover shields are available in all wattages including the 50w. Osram, philips, lohuis, GE, etc all make a range with the glass shields.
    and does anyone know why they make it with a glass cover?

  10. #10
    Gold Member Martinco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Rustenburg
    Posts
    927
    Thanks
    175
    Thanked 136 Times in 108 Posts
    Next time I have a better look,
    however do you not think that the 50w with a shield would not operate at a much higher temperature than an open one ?
    Martin Coetzee
    Supplier of Stainless Steel Band and Buckle and various fastening systems. Steel, Plastic, Galvanized, PET and Poly woven.
    We solve your fastening problems.
    www.straptite.com

    You may never know what results will come from your actions, but if you do nothing, there will be no results... Rudy Malan 05/03/2011

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •