Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: New client meeting. Help needed.

  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    323
    Thanks
    87
    Thanked 24 Times in 22 Posts

    New client meeting. Help needed.

    Hi all,

    So I've been calling this client a few times & finally got through to the lady who's under the Manager. ( If I can put it that way). Got the lead from a walk-in cold call.

    Their IT sux ( direct quote ), so my work is 1/2 done. they looking to get someone as an offsite IT guy. You know, pay x-amount per month for x-amount of hours. SLA.

    The current IT guy takes too long to respond to problems logged, hence the reason they want to get someone else.

    Now......

    I have a meeting at 10am Wednesday next week. 13 April. But, and please try to keep the laughter at a minimum, I don't have any glossy folders or anything to do a presentation.

    I normally get my clients by fixing problems they have, and they see that I know what I'm doing, to put it that way.

    Should I get something together? Like services I offer, and expand a bit on them in the "interview"? Remember, I have my own sole prop company, so this would be an interview for them to use my company. ie ME

    It's a small company, round about 7 PC's, with a JHB branch. From what I can tell, the CPT branch handles whatever IT needs they have.

    Company has the funds to contract someone out.

    What does the company do? They fix Vodacom towers when they faulty. Something like that. So they get contracted out by Vodacom.

    So, should I slap something together? Like a small flip file thingy? Should I leave something behind after I have the interview?

    Your help would be greatly appreciated. I'm really excited about this client, and don't want to screw it up.

    Please ask me if you need more info.

    Thx guys!

  2. #2
    Moderator IanF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Jhb
    Posts
    2,615
    Thanks
    191
    Thanked 520 Times in 398 Posts
    Andrew
    We prints tons of our kwikfolders you need to see if someone in Cape Town can do a similar thing.
    Just keep it simple and make sure you have the correct rights for any photos logos etc. that you use.
    Only stress when you can change the outcome!

  3. #3
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    323
    Thanks
    87
    Thanked 24 Times in 22 Posts
    OK so I take it I need some kind of literature when I go into the meeting. Maybe leave a folder with them? Stating my services, what I do, etc?

  4. #4
    Moderator IanF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Jhb
    Posts
    2,615
    Thanks
    191
    Thanked 520 Times in 398 Posts
    I would take them something.
    Use your website as a template and cherry pick the services they may be interested in. Then do a powerpoint presentation which you can give them a print out (colour laser not inkjet) and have it bound, if it is good put it on a CD a little mini CD always amazes people Just personalise it for the company and the decision maker, people love seeing their name in print. For one customer that is what I would do, then you can use their feedback on what to put in a brochure.
    Only stress when you can change the outcome!

  5. Thanks given for this post:

    Perform Computers (05-Apr-11)

  6. #5
    Diamond Member Justloadit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    2,671
    Thanks
    88
    Thanked 544 Times in 460 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Just remember anything(presentation) more than 10 minutes and you have lost them. Keep it short sweet and to the point, highlighting what you do.
    Victor - Knowledge is a blessing or a curse, your current circumstances make you decide!
    Solar and LED lighting solutions - www.microsolve.co.za

  7. #6
    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    20,981
    Thanks
    3,056
    Thanked 2,463 Times in 2,068 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew_ZA View Post
    But, and please try to keep the laughter at a minimum, I don't have any glossy folders or anything to do a presentation.

    Should I get something together? Like services I offer, and expand a bit on them in the "interview"? Remember, I have my own sole prop company, so this would be an interview for them to use my company. ie ME

    Should I leave something behind after I have the interview?
    I picked out the bits that struck me.

    Two things I learned from Lobbying 101.

    • Interviews go both ways. It is as important (if not more so) that you clearly identify their needs and expectations as they find out things about you. Ask lots of questions about them and their organisation before you get into detail about what you can do for them.
    • Leave behinds are just that - only give it at the end of the meeting if you want their full attention during it.


    Your goal should be to clearly identify what they want and need, and then return with a clear proposal later.

    If you are confident that you know what they want, you could have an agreement or form to complete handy, but I wouldn't be whipping it out right up front. Hauling out forms is part of closing. (Leaving behind a credit application for for them to fill in with your business card pinned to it has pretty good posture).

    But here's the thing - I get the sense reading between the lines you're still feeling the market. There's nothing wrong with this, and let me try to set your mind at ease about going in naked.

    When we draw up a brochure or a leave-behind, it draws on information gathered from lots of "interviews" where we went in with nothing much more than a smile, a business card and an open mind.

    When you start identifying the common issues, concerns, questions, needs, wants, misunderstandings that keep coming up, that's powerful stuff to cover in a brochure. But I suggest before you've covered some ground, what you probably will put in there will be your assumptions of what the client needs to hear, and you run the risk of actually losing a sale rather than improving your prospects if any of those assumptions are off the mark.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

  8. Thank given for this post:

    BusFact (06-Apr-11), Perform Computers (06-Apr-11)

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •