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Thread: INDUSTRY PLEADS: STOP USING BANNED PESTICIDES!

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    INDUSTRY PLEADS: STOP USING BANNED PESTICIDES!

    Users of pesticides should have a very careful look at what they are spraying. Chlordane, dieldrin, arsenic or monocroptophos are banned and if any of these names appear on the label, the user may face legal action. Monocropthophos, in particular, is a highly toxic organophosphate and its continued use on cash crops results in a great loss of wildlife.

    Dr Gerhard Verdoorn of the Griffon Poison Centre told delegates at the recent SAPCA (South African Pest Control Association) PestBiz Convention and AVCASA (Association of Veterinary and Crop Associations of SA) that while commercial farmers are largely aware of the dangers and have stopped using sprays containing illegal substances, many home and market gardeners still use them out of ignorance. He said 99 percent of emergency calls to the centre related to home and garden markets, while only 1 percent came from commercial agriculture.

    In an attempt to aid the speedy removal of Monocroptophos and other illegal pesticides, AVCASA has extended an invitation to all farmers and the general public who are still in possession of banned pesticides to call the organisation for advice and support, so they can be disposed of in the safest way possible.

    Rentokil and other reputable pest control companies agreed with Verdoorn and said they were practising Integrated Pest Management (IPM) through a combination of anticipative and preventative procedures. Clients were informed of the methods and pesticides used on their premises and this gave them peace of mind. A successful IPM program included proper waste management, structural repair, building maintenance, mechanical control and pesticide application.

    Verdoorn exposed some of the false reassurances given by disreputable companies, like: “Diazinon perfectly safe for people” and “pyrethroids are safe for the environment”. He said some pest control operators were using unregistered products, failed to give instructions to vacate premises and generally disregarded safety regulations in terms of Act No. 36 of 1947. He advised consumers to insist on knowing what type of chemicals pest control organisations were using on their premises and what safety precautions were being taken.

    Deena Govender, Quality Assurance Manager for Rentokil South Africa, said as an international pest control company Rentokil only used safe and approved pesticides and had stopped using several of the above-mentioned chemicals long before they became banned in South Africa.

    “Rentokil is committed to using Integrated Pest Control Management (IPM) strategies to ensure safe, long term solutions for our clients. That’s in line with our motto to remain leaders in safe pest control.”

    Act 36 of 1947 required all pest control operators to be registered with the Department of Agriculture before applying pesticides.

    Govender said Rentokil only used pesticides registered in terms of this act and to ensure the safety of its workers and clients the company also complied with the Hazardous Substances Act (Act 15 of 1973). Technicians were also fully trained in the safe use of pesticides.

    Visit www.sapca.org.za for a list of SAPCA registered pest control companies to use.

    Media release issued by Affinity Strategic Communication on behalf of SAPCA and Rentokil South Africa.

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    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
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    This is a joke. If your restaurant/pub/cafe or whatever can be free of roaches/ants for 2 years & counting, why use a legal poison.

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    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
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    These press releases are quite informative although they are basically Rentokill advertisements.

    Illegal poisons end up in the water-table and even the ocean in some areas. Also disposal of monocrotophos poisons in landfill sites kills the local bird population.
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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparks View Post
    This is a joke. If your restaurant/pub/cafe or whatever can be free of roaches/ants for 2 years & counting, why use a legal poison.
    Because your restaurant can still be free of roaches without using these really harmful products.

    Given the choice, I'd prefer to have food that is not contaminated by pathogens that roaches carry and free of toxic residues and without causing needless damage to the environment.

    I trust you were just stirring things up?
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
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    Sadly I wish I was Dave. There are weazles in all the industries. It is not just the consumers who are victims but the sods who do go that way end up slitting their own throats too. They kill the market. I was affiliated with a Pest Control company while in Cape Town and marketed myself along with them(all in one package). The business owners laughed in my face, no roaches for 2 years already and when they do come back they know who to call.

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