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Thread: Visa and Mastercard Scam - Clever

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    Platinum Member sterne.law@gmail.com's Avatar
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    Visa and Mastercard Scam - Clever

    This one is pretty slick since they provide YOU with all the information, except the one piece they want.

    Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. This information is worth reading. By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.

    One of our employees was called on Wednesday from 'VISA', and I was called on Thursday from 'MasterCard'.

    The scam works like this: Person calling says, 'This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for R497.99 from a Marketing company based in ....When you say 'No', the caller continues with, 'Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from R297 to R497, just under the R500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?' You say 'yes'. The caller continues: 'I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card (0800-VISA) and ask for Security. You will need to refer to this Control Number.' The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. 'Do you need me to read it again?' Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works: the caller then says, 'I need to verify you are in possession of your card.' He'll ask you to 'turn your card over and look for some numbers.' There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, 'That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?' After you say, 'No,' the caller then thanks you and states, 'Don't hesitate to call back if you do', and hangs up. You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of R497.99 was charged to our card.

    To cut a long story short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or MasterCard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3-digit PIN number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement, you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

    What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday I got a call from 'Jason of MasterCard' with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening.

    Please pass this on to all your family and friends. By informing each other, we protect each other.'
    Anthony Sterne

    www.acumenholdings.co.za
    DISCLAIMER The above is merely a comment in discussion form and an open public arena. It does not constitute a legal opinion or professional advice in any manner or form.

  2. Thank given for this post:

    Dave A (05-May-10), desA (05-May-10), IanF (05-May-10)

  3. #2
    Platinum Member desA's Avatar
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    Thanks very much for the tip-off. Man, these scamsters are really getting good.
    In search of South African Technology Nuggets(R), for sale & trading in South East Asia.

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    Diamond Member tec0's Avatar
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    This is interesting because I would love to know how the scammer gets your information “not your card number but address and so on. This happened to me last week. I got a phone call from one of the banks. They confirmed my identity number, my address and then continued to ask me about Internet security more intermit details.

    I hanged up. The number was listed as unknown “I phoned my mobile service provider and fortunately a have more than 2 of them.” And asked if they can tell me who phoned me last. I was told that it would be impossible for them to give me that information!

    I then phoned the bank in question and informed them that someone had my details not ALL my details but enough to be intimidating. They said they will contact me and as of now I was never phoned. “Just shows you how little the banks actually care for their customers”

    A few days later I was told by a friend that syndicate at a local store. They would clone your card and then somehow copy your pin number. There were arrests made that day about 8 of them all people that worked at the cash points.

    Now as far as I know a “smart card” the one with the electronic chip in it, is much more secure and cannot be copied “so I was told” So I would recommend you upgrade to these cards.
    peace is a state of mind
    Disclaimer: everything written by me can be considered as fictional.

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    internal?

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    Gold Member daveob's Avatar
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    Smart Cards ( aka Chip Cards ) are the answer - but not to everything. Had one a while now, and if your pin is compromised and your card nicked, it's the same as any other card.

    First experience was frustrating as well - new Pick n Pay in Toti has about 60 till points, and it opened with only one (1) portable machine capable of accepting chip cards. Can you believe it ? Imagine holding up the till at month end whil ethey search for the 1 portable machine. Things have improved the last few months.
    Watching the ships passing by.

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erika Gordon View Post
    internal?
    Good question.

    Off the top of my head there are two places where credit card details and telephone numbers often go together - car rental companies and hotels.

    Worse still, I've known both to take a rubbing of the card too as the modern machine tends to just print out the last 4 digits of the card on the transaction slips.

    It would just take anyone with access to those sorts of records.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Platinum Member sterne.law@gmail.com's Avatar
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    Getting card details is really easy, especially with computers every where. In a restaurant the actual till system can be used. Many systems have staff swipe a card to log in, so a card reader is easily available, save into a note pad doc and thats it. you have the entire magnetic card strip details inside of 10 seconds.
    Also becuase company's have to keep the credit card slip any staff with access to the files can go at any time and pick a few numbers. The slip has the expiry date, card number..only need the ccv. Getting the ID numbe ris more challenging but there are plenty of transactions where ID is required. its tough
    Anthony Sterne

    www.acumenholdings.co.za
    DISCLAIMER The above is merely a comment in discussion form and an open public arena. It does not constitute a legal opinion or professional advice in any manner or form.

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    Diamond Member tec0's Avatar
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    Well it has been my experience that there are a lot of people inside a bank including sales people that have access to your account details. The real kicker is that you have to go to the bank to disable there access personally and you have to give a reason why you are limiting access? Honestly I am not making this up! I am actually going to the bank tomorrow to change my so-called settings! Have a look at yours and see what the word “default” really means.
    peace is a state of mind
    Disclaimer: everything written by me can be considered as fictional.

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