Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Garden pest identification

  1. #1
    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,642
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 94 Times in 77 Posts

    Garden pest identification

    I've been struggling to identify this bug, and this is the only place in South Africa that I know of that might be able to help. Any ideas what this is?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	flower_eating_insects.jpg 
Views:	185 
Size:	87.2 KB 
ID:	549  
    [SIGPIC]Engineer Simplicity[/SIGPIC]
    Turn ideas into products | The Art of Engineering blog

  2. #2
    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    20,979
    Thanks
    3,055
    Thanked 2,462 Times in 2,067 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    It looks like one of the chafers or possibly one of the monkey beetles. I can possibly narrow it down with an accurate length and a top shot.

    The most likely candidate from what I've seen is the flower chafer. There are variants with different colouration which could make getting it down to species tricky.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

  3. #3
    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,642
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 94 Times in 77 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    It looks like one of the chafers or possibly one of the monkey beetles. I can possibly narrow it down with an accurate length and a top shot.
    Thanks! That at least gives me a name to search for so I can find a suitable solution Don't think it is too important to identify the exact one, but it's body is about 5mm long. It is on a gold-coin daisy, but they are also infesting my gazanias.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	flower_chafer.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	82.8 KB 
ID:	550  
    Last edited by duncan drennan; 28-Oct-08 at 09:56 AM.
    [SIGPIC]Engineer Simplicity[/SIGPIC]
    Turn ideas into products | The Art of Engineering blog

  4. #4
    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,642
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 94 Times in 77 Posts
    Searching for "flower chafer site:za" turned up this useful site, http://www.insecta.co.za/
    [SIGPIC]Engineer Simplicity[/SIGPIC]
    Turn ideas into products | The Art of Engineering blog

  5. #5
    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    20,979
    Thanks
    3,055
    Thanked 2,462 Times in 2,067 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    5mm? If that is the total length, it's pretty small for a chafer.

    Scarabaeidae generally start at 9mms and are mostly quite a bit larger than that.

    More likely one of the monkey beetles - they're from the same family and quite a few species are specific to the Western Cape.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

  6. #6
    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,642
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 94 Times in 77 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    More likely one of the monkey beetles - they're from the same family and quite a few species are specific to the Western Cape.
    Quick search on the web for a monkey beetle reveals that it is definitely one of those. From everything that I can find, it turns out that these are actually important pollinators of the daisy family. Not too sure why I am being over run by them, but I'll just leave them to get on with their business - maybe it will attract some more birds.
    [SIGPIC]Engineer Simplicity[/SIGPIC]
    Turn ideas into products | The Art of Engineering blog

  7. #7
    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    20,979
    Thanks
    3,055
    Thanked 2,462 Times in 2,067 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by duncan drennan View Post
    Not too sure why I am being over run by them,
    Because the pickings are good at the moment (true) and they know you're soft on bugs (speculative)
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    JHB
    Posts
    271
    Thanks
    73
    Thanked 76 Times in 56 Posts
    Jikkels stikkels Dave, is there anything that you don't know something about??? LOL

    Any suggestions on ant infestations - in my BATHROOM nogals!! Ironically, the more I clean and disinfect, the bigger the attracation? They appear to be something in between common garden variety black "sugar ants" and red ants??

  9. #9
    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    20,979
    Thanks
    3,055
    Thanked 2,462 Times in 2,067 Posts
    Blog Entries
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Morticia View Post
    Jikkels stikkels Dave, is there anything that you don't know something about???
    Lots still to learn - trust me. My original business specialty was an inspector for wood-destroying insects (of economic significance) and it all got out of control from there. The original long story, and I won't bore with the details.
    Quote Originally Posted by Morticia View Post
    Any suggestions on ant infestations - in my BATHROOM nogals!! Ironically, the more I clean and disinfect, the bigger the attracation? They appear to be something in between common garden variety black "sugar ants" and red ants??
    Sure, but Duncan won't like some of it.

    The keys to ant control is to identify the location of the colony and good sanitation (removing potential food sources and other attractants, harbourages and access points). Simply using an insecticide to eliminate visible ants does not control the problem and can actually aggravate it. Only between 10 & 20% of the colony forages, and as is the way with nature when threatened (with a high mortality rate among foragers, for example), the reproduction instinct gets stronger. With ants in particular, the colony could "bud" or split into multiple colonies more regularly as a survival mechanism. You now have multiple breeding colonies in different locations instead of just one.

    For this reason the colony must be targeted and eliminated, either by direct application of an insecticide to the colony or with a bait program if the colony is not so easy to locate.

    Moving to more Duncan friendly points (and they really do help ) - Reduce potential harbourages (places where the ant colony could set up home) by sealing cracks and crevices (caulking). Also recognise food and water sources that might be attracting ants to areas where you don't want them and make sure they're not available. When it comes to food and food storage, small habit changes can make a big difference with a little patience. Done right, the ants will go elsewhere and no longer be a "pest."

    Actual method detail changes somewhat between colonies that are indoors as opposed to colonies that are outdoors, but the underlying principles remain much the same.
    Last edited by Dave A; 28-Oct-08 at 04:59 PM.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

  10. #10
    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,642
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 94 Times in 77 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    Done right, the ants will go elsewhere and no longer be a "pest."
    Sugar water on your neighbours porch might work.......
    [SIGPIC]Engineer Simplicity[/SIGPIC]
    Turn ideas into products | The Art of Engineering blog

  11. Thanks given for this post:

    Morticia (29-Oct-08)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Registration as a Pest Control Operator
    By landsberg1 in forum Pest Control Industry Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-Jan-16, 02:28 PM
  2. Organic pest control
    By duncan drennan in forum Pest Control Industry Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-Sep-10, 11:49 AM
  3. Top 5 unethical practices in pest control.
    By Dave A in forum Pest Control Industry Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Jun-09, 05:56 AM
  4. Durban pest problems set to continue.
    By Dave A in forum Pest Control Industry Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 28-Mar-07, 04:46 PM

Tags for this Thread

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •