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Thread: investment question!

  1. #1
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    investment question!

    if you had R400 000 from a previous propery would you

    invest the whole amount into your new property to keep the repayment low or invest the the whole amount in a investment and use the monthly interest
    to pay some of your new bond...or just invest the whole amount in a long term equity for 15 to 20 years. alternatively

    buy a small bachlor flat cash and use the monthly income to put into your new bond or sell it later for a profit or buy a small business.

    any suggestions ?

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    Gold Member daveob's Avatar
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    Looks like the ideal subject for a poll.
    Last edited by daveob; 19-Feb-08 at 03:46 PM.
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    Platinum Member Chatmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raf View Post
    if you had R400 000 from a previous propery would you

    invest the whole amount into your new property to keep the repayment low or invest the the whole amount in a investment and use the monthly interest
    to pay some of your new bond...or just invest the whole amount in a long term equity for 15 to 20 years. alternatively

    buy a small bachlor flat cash and use the monthly income to put into your new bond or sell it later for a profit or buy a small business.

    any suggestions ?
    A year ago I would have suggested that you dump the money into your existing property as the rate at which the property prices were growing was equal to none.

    Things has changed since then and Standard bank issued a statement yesterday that the property price growth is down considerably. However there is still a large demand for property which means to me that rentals should be in high demand.

    I am no investment professional but I would suggest that you check out flats or houses that are about to be repossessed by the banks and pick up a property that are below value and rent it out. That way you have property that is already worth more than what you pay for and you earn a decent income of it each month.

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    There's a wonderful story I heard - I'm sure it was an advert actually.

    In 1600 (something) Mahattan Island was bought from the locals for a handful of beads.
    Today Manhattan Island is worth (lots of money).

    If those locals had invested the value of the beads in an interest bearing account, the value of that account would today be worth (even more money). The power of compound interest.

    It was an eye opener.

    Now I'm inclined to say that blue chips are outperforming interest over the long haul, and of course the last 400 years may not have a bearing on the next ten.

    So I would lean towards balancing your portfolio a bit.

    Note: I'm not a financial advisor.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Email problem RKS Computer Solutions's Avatar
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    Hi raf, please read the PM I sent you, I have included personal bank details plus a document you need to sign wavering me of any responsibility towards the new-found 400k...

    hahahahahaha

    Seriously though, where are you based? My suggestion is to find a Financial Advisor, and discuss your various options. We can comment all we like, but unless you sit down with someone professionaly and get all your details and aims on the table, we will all be shooting in the dark.

    Good luck and be safe!

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    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
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    Raf, what are your goals and needs with the money? Cash flow, capital growth, security?
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    Raf, the question posed by dsd is very important. The investment strategy for each goal will differ substantially. Below is just some of my thoughts on the subject. Read this while keeping in mind that my own goal is long term capital growth.

    South Africa's current account deficit is currently standing at more than 8% of GDP. What's more, this figure is expected to grow for at least another three years. The driver of this situation is simple, we are importing considerable capital assets (machinery etc) to drive our local capital expansion and not exporting enough goods and services to fund this outflow of money. Because we have to pay for these capital assets in foreign currency, there is a net drop in demand for the rand (selling rands to purchase, say pounds). We can therefor expect the value of the rand to slide commensurately against other major currencies. Unfortunately we can't see into the future, but based on the little we know, it would be advisable to invest your money offshore. Of course the simplest way to achieve this is to invest in exchange traded funds. Currently only two Itrix funds are available but an additional three will be launched soon. Contact a broker to find out more. Alternatively, in my opinion the SA banking shares are offering excellent value and was probably oversold by foreign investors.

    Please note that I'm not a financial adviser but I do have much of my own money invested in both Itrix funds as well as in Standard Bank Ltd and Investec Ltd.

    In the very long run (20 years +) you probably won't loose out on well chosen property. However, to make good returns in the short term, you'll need lots of property investment know-how and of course some luck.

    Lastly, if you are unsure, the best might be to temporarily leave your money in a money market fund. You can get before tax returns of roughly 11% with a minimum amount of risk exposure. SARS will allow you a R19000 interest exemption per annum. If you are married and your wife doesn't earn any interest income, you can donate some of the money to her so that you both make use of your exemptions. Donations between spouses are not subject to donations tax, unless SARS suspects you of trying to evade tax :-).

    Again, I'm not a financial adviser, I'm simply posting my own thoughts around the issue. You have to fit the facts to your own needs and circumstances.

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    One more thought. The real power of property investments come from the leverage effect that you get by borrowing money. Essentially this means that you can say, invest only R300000 in a new property and have the tenant's rent cover the outstanding bond repayments. You then still have an additional R100000 to invest elsewhere. However to achieve this now, you'll almost certainly have to pick up a bank repossessed property at a bargain price.

    If you buy a property cash, the investment question boils down to what your time horizon is because in the long run your equities would ALMOST certainly outperform such a property investment.

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    Bronze Member Karenwhe's Avatar
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    I am not financial advisor either [end of disclaimer]

    1. You can invest the whole amount somewhere (not the stock market in the following situation, or very little in SM).

    2. Once that is done, then you could buy property (more than one) based on your affordability which will include the amount invested with a bond to the max they give you (if you have good affordability + your invested amount 100% bond should be easy).

    You make sure the property is cash+ (essential).

    3. Then (give it 1 to 2 years depending on market) you refinance your properties to the new equity, with your new affordability with the cash+ and your amount invested (which assumably has not been touched).

    4. Then you take the refinanced money and buy more property cash+.

    5. and you repeat the process until you are financially free, which shouldn't take that long if you have good solid affordability and you keep buying the correct properties.



    6. Then you could add to that the stock market and take some of that money (a little though) learn to invest with it (warning: this could be painful at the beginning).

    7. Double that amount in the stock market, put the initial amount back where you took it from and,

    8. Repeat the process.

    This of course is just an idea, hope this helps. It is easier said than done, but done it is by investors all the time. It just takes time to learn how to do it.

    P.S. No offense to financial planners, but I wouldn't use one as they sell you what they get commission on. I would rather learn to invest myself in all asset classes (which I did in my life), than buy all sorts of financial planner products.
    Last edited by Dave A; 23-Feb-08 at 09:52 AM.

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    Platinum Member Chatmaster's Avatar
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    I wish I can one day understand how you can make money buying a property you eventually pay double or tipple for, sigh. My head is just to flat for this...

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