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Thread: Fumigation requirement for round-wood import

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    Fumigation requirement for round-wood import

    Hello everyone!

    Our company is thinking to import softwood (pine) from overseas for crates production in SA. Do you know if fumigation regulations apply in that case. should fumigation be done on the exporter's or importer's territory?

    best regards,

    Maria

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    Silver Member Vincent's Avatar
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    Hi Maria and Welcome

    This is interesting because, I have to restore a pair of old chairs, similar to recliners (about 70yrs old) and have to export them to a friend who has moved to Cyprus. I was wondering the same, should they be fumigated and treated before export.

    I understand that fumigation must be done from the exporters side, but not too sure if it's for everything.
    Vincent Marino
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    All timber exported to another country needs to comply with the phytosanitary requirements of the importing country and in this case would need fumigation of the softwood poles. Once the timber is reworked into packaging material it falls within the ambit of the IPPC and under Ispm 15 which is specifically for packaging material and it would then have to undergo a full fumigation or Heat treatment and is then stamped to comply with international regulation by the fumigator in the export country.
    Chairs do not fall into the Ispm 15 catagory but will have to be fumigated to comply with phytosanitary requirements of the importing country.
    Henk Pottas
    International Pest Management Consultants

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    Thanks for a prompt and detailed reply Henk,

    but I'm still looking to find SA specific wood import requirements, as we do manufacture pallets here in SA. As far as I found it: there's no phytosanitary requirements for the wood, only ISPM 15 for the wood products.

    Maria






    Quote Originally Posted by HENK View Post
    All timber exported to another country needs to comply with the phytosanitary requirements of the importing country and in this case would need fumigation of the softwood poles. Once the timber is reworked into packaging material it falls within the ambit of the IPPC and under Ispm 15 which is specifically for packaging material and it would then have to undergo a full fumigation or Heat treatment and is then stamped to comply with international regulation by the fumigator in the export country.
    Chairs do not fall into the Ispm 15 catagory but will have to be fumigated to comply with phytosanitary requirements of the importing country.
    Henk Pottas
    International Pest Management Consultants

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria View Post
    As far as I found it: there's no phytosanitary requirements for the wood, only ISPM 15 for the wood products.
    That was what stopped me from posting a reply earlier. I'm not aware of a phytosanitary clearance requirement for importation either, but it is a bit outside of my field.

    I do recall that it is illegal to sell infested timber, though. I just can't find the relevant legislation. It's very old - promulgated somewhere between 1954 to 1956 with an amendment in 1978 from memory. This has been the undoing of many a second hand furniture dealer, because most often they end up footing the bill.

    This ability to claim back on the sale of infested timber might extend beyond our borders. I've been called in a number of times on imported timber cases to express an expert opinion as to when the timber was first infested - this in support of a claim against the overseas supplier. However, I've never been privy to the legal foundation of those cases.

    Perhaps I'm adding to the confusion, but personally I'd try to ensure your over-border supplier did supply a phytosanitary certificate for each shipment as first prize.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Thanks Dave,

    I'll ask our suppliers for certificates.

    your help is kindly appreciated.

    All the best,

    Maria
    Last edited by Dave A; 14-Feb-08 at 11:47 AM.

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    Email problem BigRed's Avatar
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    I would suggest calling an import / export company or alternately a packing company. They are normally in the loop of what is legally required.

    I doubt the restored chairs will look nice with the ISPM 15 stamp on the wood As far as I know this stamp has to be on the wood being exported, but then again I am sure in the case of furniture, there will be a concession

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRed View Post
    I doubt the restored chairs will look nice with the ISPM 15 stamp on the wood
    There's the funny twist in this - ISPM 15 is about wood packaging material. If you take a look at the ISPM standards adopted by the IPPC, while wood-packaging material is regulated, when it comes to phytosanitary certificates the IPPC have only issued guidelines so far.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Email problem BigRed's Avatar
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    Oh OK. Just seen them stamp ISPM 15 on each and every piece of wood used for crating / packaging / dunnage when we export stuff. Steel doesnt need a stamp

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    It's a bit crazy in a way. Originally in countries that worried about such things, all the attention was on timber products as goods when it came to ferrying around wood-destroying beasties. The packaging was ignored.

    Now we've got this international convention on packaging material which is quite rigidly controlled while in many parts of the world, the attention to timber goods is far from where it should be. A reversal of sorts.

    Comment about steel noted. There's also a growing trend towards other alternatives, such as plastic pallets.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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