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Thread: Electricity rationing a possibillity

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Electricity rationing a possibillity

    I see one of the options being considered to solve the electricity shortage is to introduce rationing.
    South Africans could soon be faced with electricity quotas. Speaking to The Star on Sunday, Jacob Maroga, Eskom's chief executive, revealed that the parastatal was working on a plan which would see household and private industry usage being rationed.

    According to Maroga, this ration would be calculated using an average consumption minus a specific percentage reduction.

    Consumers who use more than their defined quota could face punitive costs or face being cut off.
    from IOL here
    Hmm. I wonder if Alusaf will attract a punitive rate?
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Junior Member OldGoat's Avatar
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    That's a bit rough. It's not really how much we use but when we use it.

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldGoat View Post
    It's not really how much we use but when we use it.
    Exactly! The most effective strategy would be one that focuses on moving peak demands around.

    To some extent you would need to change how power is metered and sold. Have a peak rate and an off-peak rate. One heck of a meter conversion, though. Maybe if they started off with the high power consumers and then worked their way down - we might not even have to get down to the household level.

    This would also give business a financial incentive to deal with the labour issues that will come with changing standard working hours.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    just me duncan drennan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave A View Post
    Have a peak rate and an off-peak rate. One heck of a meter conversion, though.
    Isn't this already in place for larger consumers? Or is it just dependant on your power factor?
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    What concerns me is that our office is at home. We have a large power bill for a residence. How will the allowed usage be calculated?
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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsd View Post
    Isn't this already in place for larger consumers?
    At the moment bigger consumers can negotiate cheaper rates - if they are on Eskom directly. I don't know if the time of day when they take their draw is taken into account - somehow I doubt it.
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Platinum Member Chatmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debbiedle View Post
    What concerns me is that our office is at home. We have a large power bill for a residence. How will the allowed usage be calculated?
    I have the exact same problem. We have a house with a separate flat and my office is running from the flat. That is also clearly visible if you compare my bill with my previous residence. How exactly do they plan on making the calculation? I can't exactly ration my electricity for my office!

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    I fully expect to be well below average both at home and at work. Maybe we'll be able to trade credits
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    Platinum Member SilverNodashi's Avatar
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    man, this is going to hurt a lot of small / SME / home -based business, which are very common in our country.

    I'm already budgettting for some extra UPS's & `n nice big generator to go with that.

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Some details of the rationing proposal.
    The government would implement an electricity-rationing programme as a "quick-hit" solution to address the current power blackouts, said Sonjica.

    "We have discussed how quotas will be allocated, who will be exempt from the programme, what incentives and penalties will be in place, when it will start and what legislative enablers we need to have in place for the programme to work," Sonjica said.

    When this rationing programme would be implemented was not clear. Eskom CEO Jacob Maroga said it might take "weeks to months".

    A concept proposal on the rationing programme submitted to the Cabinet includes quota allocations for various electricity users, penalties and cut-offs, quota trading and flexibility of the programme.

    It is designed to achieve the overall savings target of between 10% and 15% over time.

    To have an immediate saving of 8%, industrial users would have to use 10% less electricity; commercial users 15% less; hotels, resorts, shopping malls and conference centres 20%;, large office buildings, the government and municipalities 15% less; agriculture 5% less; and residences 10%.

    Penalties, which are yet to be determined, would be given for electricity use above the allocated quota and electricity supply to repeat offenders would be cut off.

    An incentive scheme is being established for smaller consumers who exceed the savings targets, while large consumers could trade the unused portion of their quota allocations.
    full story from M&G here
    The same article also discusses alternative energy sources such as replacing incandescant light bulbs with CFLs, solar water heaters and switching to liquified petroleum gas.

    However, I think this statement is going to be remembered for a while to come. Asked what to tell South Africans about the electricity crisis, Public Enterprises Minister Alec Erwin replied:
    Switch off your lights if you are not using them.
    So as you leave the room or the country, please remember to switch off the lights.

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