Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: connectors

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    connectors

    Good day folks

    I just have a question about what connectors are preferred for light and plug circuits of th following connectors :
    1. Strip connectors
    2. Hellacon connectors
    3. Scotchlok connectors
    4. Twist connectors

  2. #2
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    I personally use Wago connectors. As far as I know twist connectors are specifically forbidden in the regs but could be used inside appliances in certain circumstances.

    On the odd occasion I use choc block type connectors I use the nylon type which are better heat resistance and also the type with the internal wire protection plate that stops the screw from cutting into the wire. Name:  w1.jpg
Views: 240
Size:  31.8 KB



    It's worth spending a little extra on connectors, they're a know cause of fires if they are poorly manufactured or installed.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Hi Andy. Thanks for the reply. I assume the wago connectors are a better quality than the Hellacon connectors? Also would like to know your take on the scotchlok connectors?
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    I haven't used the Helicon connectors much so I don't know which are better but from what I've read the Helicon are good. The only Scotchlok connectors I've ever used are for comms wiring like Telkom circuits and the grease filled IDC (insulation displacement) type for automotive. Out of interest which model Scotchloks are you referring to? I'm sure they probably make 230v models but all the Scotchlok connectors I've ever encountered are for ELV (<50v) use.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I was told by a registered installation electrician that the scotchlok IDC is fine to use on light and plug circuits but im not sure thats why i want to find out if its allowed or not. I checked on the website 3M scotchlok connectors are rated up to 600v but it does not stipulate the rated amps?

  6. #6
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    Being told by a registered electrician wouldn't qualify you'd need to see a datasheet (and be able to produce one in future) with the current rating, voltage rating as well as their suitability for solid and stranded conductors etc. They'd also need to be suitably SANS approved. My personal take on IDC connectors is that they're not suitable for 230/400v electrical installations but that's just my opinion which doesn't count for much.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  7. Thanks given for this post:

    Dave A (28-Jun-16)

  8. #7
    Bronze Member ACEsterhuizen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    129
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked 18 Times in 14 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by AndyD View Post
    I personally use Wago connectors. As far as I know twist connectors are specifically forbidden in the regs but could be used inside appliances in certain circumstances.......

    On the odd occasion I use choc block type connectors I use the nylon type which are better heat resistance and also the type with the internal wire protection plate that stops the screw from cutting into the wire.

    Andy, morning, please refer me to the specific regulation re twist connectors in the regs, all I can find is this:

    "6.12.1.5 Connections of earth continuity conductors shall not rely only on
    twisting of the conductor or strands of the conductor"

    As far as i know the connector must comply with: (In SANS 10142 regs) Page 53.

    SANS 1433-1, Electrical terminals and connectors – Part 1: Terminal
    blocks having screw and screwless terminals.

    and

    SANS 1433-2, Electrical terminals and connectors – Part 2: Flat push-on
    connectors.

    and

    6.3.7 Joints and terminations:

    6.3.7.1 Joints and terminations of cables, cores and conductors shall be
    made in accordance with manufacturers' instructions or the
    appropriate part of SANS 10198. Flexible cables shall only be joined
    using cable couplers or manufacturers' jointing kits. All joints
    shall be accessible, protected against strain, and protected in accordance
    with 5.1.1, except for joints made and sealed permanently and intended
    to be maintenance free

    6.3.7.2 Joints and terminations shall not
    a) adversely affect the current-carrying capacity, the insulation resistance
    or the earth continuity of the cable, core or conductor in which
    they are made,
    b) be made in any connector, bend, elbow or tee-piece of a conduit,
    c) allow the strands of a stranded conductor to spread, or
    d) require strands of a stranded conductor to be cut away to allow
    connection of the conductors (for example, to terminals).

    6.3.7.3 Any armouring or sheathing shall be terminated in or on
    equipment. Armour wires shall be terminated by a clamp or gland in such
    a way that
    a) pressure is not applied to insulating material, and
    b) there is an earth tag washer (or similar) for connecting to the earth
    continuity conductor.

    and

    7.8.5 Electrical connections:

    7.8.5.1 Joints in cables shall be avoided, however if required, they shall
    be made in an enclosure that affords a degree of protection not less than
    IP4X.
    Last edited by ACEsterhuizen; 28-Jun-16 at 01:56 PM. Reason: more info

  9. #8
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by ACEsterhuizen View Post
    Andy, morning, please refer me to the specific regulation re twist connectors in the regs,
    I actually had a vague memory there was a reg but as you quite rightly say it only refers to the CPC /earth wires/bonding wires and even then it doesn't forbid twist joints unless they're loose. The inclusion of the word 'only' would imply if the twist joint had supplementary mechanical reinforcement it would be acceptable.

    6.12.1.5 Connections of earth continuity conductors shall not rely only on
    twisting of the conductor or strands of the conductor

    I'm not sure if there's anything relevant in SANS10198 about twist joints.
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

  10. Thanks given for this post:

    ACEsterhuizen (28-Jun-16)

  11. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Port Elizabeth
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Hi I found this data sheet that gives the current ratings of the different scotchlok connector sizes. But is this product allowable and sabs approved?
    Attached Files Attached Files

  12. #10
    Diamond Member AndyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    4,403
    Thanks
    513
    Thanked 854 Times in 687 Posts
    I have no idea if it's SABS approved, you'd have to inquire with whoever is selling them.

    At a glance these things are clearly aimed at US wire sizes which are AWG. The problem comes with metric wire sizes where 2.5mm˛ doesn't correspond to an AWG size so if you look at the sizing table the blue connectors work for 0.8-2.0mm˛ and the yellow connectors work for 3.0mm˛ so none of those would be suitable for 2.5mm˛ which is the most commonly used wire size for circuits. Also they're a tee type connector which is little use for most installation joints.

    Why are you so interested in the scotchlok type connectors? Why not just use the helicon type or choc blocks that are available from nearly all the SA wholesalers?
    _______________________________________________
    I am special and so is Vanash.
    _______________________________________________

Similar Threads

  1. [Question] Insulation piercing connectors
    By kahoel117 in forum Electrical Contracting Industry Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20-Jun-13, 11:45 AM

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Did you like this article? Share it with your favourite social network.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •