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Thread: How to CoC a changeover switch??

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    Question How to CoC a changeover switch??

    Please could someone explain what needs to be filled in on the CoC form in order to CoC a changeover switch?
    A standby generator has been wired into a changeover switch to switch between mains and generator in the event of a power failure.
    What readings do i have to put on the form in order to satisfy the CoC?
    Thanks a lot
    Simon

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    Don't think that you MUST include everything on the COC when you only certify one part.
    Of cause you must include everything related.

    I would think things like the earthing, PSC, Z'L, phase rotation is important.

    Make sure that you specify exactly what is included with the certificate and what is excluded.

    For instance the DB and circuits might be excluded from your certificate but it could mean more work for you if you offer to include it.

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    Yeah, thats what i figured.
    PSCC, Loop & Earthing.
    Not much else to test as i haven't worked on anything else.
    And then just to make it clear in the section that asks what the CoC covers, to state that it covers only the changeover switch installation.

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    The COC is for the new parts to the installation and is noted in the right-hand column. What you added must be indicated. Exclusions such as the original/existing installation must be excluded. You also need to indicate your alternative supply voltages and indicate that as such, in addition to the above stated replies.

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    I hate to be the party pooper here but unfortunately The Regulations are quite specific about additions to an electrical circuit.
    In short, you may not issue an electrical certificate for the genny until you are absolutely 100% certain that the rest of the circuit complies and the only way to do that is to perform an inspection on the entire circuit and if not already done, issue a coc for the entire circuit.
    Effectively, once you issue an additional coc for any additional circuit or any alteration to an existing circuit, you take responsibility for the entire electrical circuit, something few people are aware of.

    Reference: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT, 1993 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION REGULATIONS

    Issuing of certificate of compliance
    9.
    (1) No person other than a registered person may issue a certificate of compliance.

    (2) A registered person may issue a certificate of compliance accompanied by the required test report only after having satisfied himself or herself by means of an inspection and test that
    (a)a new electrical installation complies with the provisions of regulation 5(1) and was carried out under his or her general control; or
    (b)an electrical installation which existed prior to the publication of the current edition of the health and safety standard incorporated into these Regulations in terms of regulation 5(1), complies with the general safety principles of such standard; or
    (c)an electrical installation referred to in paragraph (b), to which extensions or alterations have been effected, that
    (i) the existing part of the electrical installation complies with the general safety principles of such standard and is reasonably safe, and
    (ii) the extensions or alterations effected comply with the provisions of regulation 5(1) and were carried out under his or her general control.

    (3)If at any time prior to the issuing of a certificate of compliance any fault or defect is detected in any part of the electrical installation, the registered person shall refuse to issue such certificate until that fault or defect has been rectified: Provided that if such fault or defect in the opinion of the registered person constitutes an immediate danger to persons in a case where electricity is already supplied, he or she shall forthwith take steps to disconnect the supply to the circuit in which the fault or defect was detected and notify the chief inspector thereof.

    (4)Any person who undertakes to do electrical installation work shall ensure that a valid certificate of compliance is issued for that work.

    (5)No person may amend a certificate of compliance.
    Last edited by Leecatt; 26-Feb-15 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Typos
    To make a mistake is human, to learn from that mistake is knowledge and knowledge is strength.

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    Gold Member Sparks's Avatar
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    In my book you have just added a new section to an existing one and as such the existing installation must be "reasonably safe"
    Your COC need also only cover the addition/alteration.

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    I tend to agree with you Sparks.
    If you have added something to the installation then only that addition needs to be CoC'd, not the entire installation surely?
    If you were asked to add an extra plug to a kitchen circuit for example, and while you were installing this you noticed that there were illegal electrics elsewhere, then i am in agreement that you would point this out and tell the owner that you would need to inspect & rectify the rest of the installation in order to issue a CoC, as you could not just walk away knowing that there are illegal connections (even if they are not your own).
    But if the installation is reasonably safe from a visual perspective, then I would only CoC that extra plug that i was asked to install...
    Would you climb in the roof and check for open junction boxes, illegal wiring, etc, after completing your plug install, or would you visually inspect what is around you and make an assessment that what you see is reasonably safe, give your CoC for the plug and leave??
    Just wondering to what extent you need to continue through the installation if the mainboard and kitchen circuit looked legal...
    Thanx for your input.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deejaypsy View Post
    I tend to agree with you Sparks.
    If you have added something to the installation then only that addition needs to be CoC'd, not the entire installation surely?
    If you were asked to add an extra plug to a kitchen circuit for example, and while you were installing this you noticed that there were illegal electrics elsewhere, then i am in agreement that you would point this out and tell the owner that you would need to inspect & rectify the rest of the installation in order to issue a CoC, as you could not just walk away knowing that there are illegal connections (even if they are not your own).
    But if the installation is reasonably safe from a visual perspective, then I would only CoC that extra plug that i was asked to install...
    Would you climb in the roof and check for open junction boxes, illegal wiring, etc, after completing your plug install, or would you visually inspect what is around you and make an assessment that what you see is reasonably safe, give your CoC for the plug and leave??
    Just wondering to what extent you need to continue through the installation if the mainboard and kitchen circuit looked legal...
    Thanx for your input.
    Well its there in the regulations, in black and white, unless i'm reading it wrong?
    To make a mistake is human, to learn from that mistake is knowledge and knowledge is strength.

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    That's right, it says in the regulations: "9.(2)(c)(i) the existing part of the electrical installation complies with the general safety principles of such standard and is reasonably safe"
    This does not imply a full inspection and ensuring that the whole installation complies as per reg 5(1).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparks View Post
    That's right, it says in the regulations: "9.(2)(c)(i) the existing part of the electrical installation complies with the general safety principles of such standard and is reasonably safe"
    This does not imply a full inspection and ensuring that the whole installation complies as per reg 5(1).
    It was explained to me that the only way that you can be sure that the existing installation complies with the general safety principles and is reasonably safe, is to inspect it. I mean that makes sense.
    Furthermore, I was told that the only way you could prove that the existing installation complies with the general safety principles and is reasonably safe is by issuing a certificate.
    Look at it this way, the regulation is clear that you will be taking responsibility for the entire installation, that much cannot be disputed, so why not inspect it all, and be sure your not going to end up in court?

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