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Thread: Electronics advances.

  1. #1
    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    Electronics advances.

    This is where we create and analyze our own ideas in advancing electronic things, okay? i am explaining htis to you very simply so you can understand, and, quite frankly, this is the only way i can understand too!

    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogue_electronics
    Analogue electronics (or analog in American English) are electronic systems with a continuously variable signal, in contrast to digital electronics where signals usually take only two different levels. The term "analogue" describes the proportional relationship between a signal and a voltage or current that represents the signal. The word analogue is derived from the Greek word ανάλογος (analogos) meaning "proportional".[1]
    Analogue electronics are superior to digital ones performance wise. this is because, well, for example, if you were to take a camera, which gives the better picture - a glass analogue one or a digital one in pixels? or, a monitor with a photo superimposed or presented on it, or a lot of little lights?

    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogue_electronics
    An analogue signal uses some attribute of the medium to convey the signal's information. For example, an aneroid barometer uses the angular position of a needle as the signal to convey the information of changes in atmospheric pressure.[2] Electrical signals may represent information by changing their voltage, current, frequency, or total charge. Information is converted from some other physical form (such as sound, light, temperature, pressure, position) to an electrical signal by a transducer which converts one type of energy into another (e.g. a microphone).[3]

    The signals take any value from a given range, and each unique signal value represents different information. Any change in the signal is meaningful, and each level of the signal represents a different level of the phenomenon that it represents. For example, suppose the signal is being used to represent temperature, with one volt representing one degree Celsius. In such a system 10 volts would represent 10 degrees, and 10.1 volts would represent 10.1 degrees.

    Another method of conveying an analogue signal is to use modulation. In this, some base carrier signal has one of its properties altered: amplitude modulation (AM) involves altering the amplitude of a sinusoidal voltage waveform by the source information, frequency modulation (FM) changes the frequency. Other techniques, such as phase modulation or changing the phase of the carrier signal, are also used.[4]

    In an analogue sound recording, the variation in pressure of a sound striking a microphone creates a corresponding variation in the current passing through it or voltage across it. An increase in the volume of the sound causes the fluctuation of the current or voltage to increase proportionally while keeping the same waveform or shape.

    Mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic and other systems may also use analogue signals.
    So, this is the way it works. how do we improve on it? well, first we need to take one aspect of it, and observe that for noise;

    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogue_electronics
    Because of the way information is encoded in analogue circuits, they are much more susceptible to noise than digital circuits, since a small change in the signal can represent a significant change in the information present in the signal and can cause the information present to be lost. Since digital signals take on one of only two different values, a disturbance would have to be about one-half the magnitude of the digital signal to cause an error; this property of digital circuits can be exploited to make signal processing noise-resistant. In digital electronics, because the information is quantized, as long as the signal stays inside a range of values, it represents the same information. Digital circuits use this principle to regenerate the signal at each logic gate, lessening or removing noise.[7]
    So, we need to clear up the noise of these superior systems. if we were to analyze that the system will present the direct applied instructions, or, really simple stuff, then you will see that it is a 'flawless' system. well, i find it flawless anyways...

    Now, if you were to look at the analogue system, you need to clear this noise that covers the whole system or 'thing.' this means that you need to clear the 'messages' to the 'system.' this means you need to clear the input to the 'system' or 'engine' or 'processor' or 'thing doer.' this can be done by, for phones, for example, you could take the wires and separate them, as they do, with rubber or something, preventing cross talk or noise from one wire to the other, like the wind blowing into your ear when you are trying to talk to your friend. this can be done better by using a single cable for the phone. this can be done by observing the simplest phone being a one way cotton string, but this is hard to put through a directory, so...

    You need to replace the telephone lines with some sort of wire that is polarized against other wires of the same material or 'stuff.' this means you need to have a few anti electrons in the wire makeup. this means you need to have a material that repels itself from the same stuff. this means you need to use the same wires for all 'connections,' so, if it is bronze, you use other bronze wires. i think they mix them up for each connection, but if they were to just use one type, problem solved.
    !! Going to my destruction !!

  2. #2
    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    Precision in electronic circuits.

    So, as we can see, you need to use things that repel each other to get rid of the noise. but that was like an hour ago, let's get more into this!

    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogue_electronics
    A number of factors affect how precise a signal is, mainly the noise present in the original signal and the noise added by processing. See signal-to-noise ratio. Fundamental physical limits such as the shot noise in components limits the resolution of analogue signals. In digital electronics additional precision is obtained by using additional digits to represent the signal; the practical limit in the number of digits is determined by the performance of the analogue-to-digital converter (ADC), since digital operations can usually be performed without loss of precision. The ADC takes an analogue signal and changes into a series of binary numbers. The ADC may be used in simple digital display devices e. g. thermometers, light meters but it may also be used in digital sound recording and in data acquisition. However, a digital-to-analogue converter (DAC) is used to change a digital signal to an analogue signal. A DAC takes a series of binary numbers and converts it to an analogue signal. It is common to find a DAC in the gain-control system of an op-amp which in turn may be used to control digital amplifiers and filters.[8]
    To get the precision better, in other words more accurate, or, make it more right, you need to simplify it so that anybody can use it. the problem with maths and science today is everybody wants to make it smaller and faster, without ripping out the overlay and starting over. if people had done this before, they would have come further quickly, as, it would have been easier to relay into a new product, yes?

    So, to make the signal more precise you need to observe the binary... it is slow and clumsy! i have done away with this recently in theory, but cannot remember how to do it right, so, let's have a go at it again - i am feeling lucky!

    Now, to get the signal more precise, we need to observe that the signal is electrical - if it was magnetic it would cause even more noise and be less precise. this means, of course, that we need to use something newer and better, like, insulation of some sort. if the electronics were using, say - silicone is a popular one? - then they would find that it would insulate the signal.

    But let's say that is too expensive and the machinery and mold to set it up would take time - you want to get your new i phone or some other loser product out there as soon as possible - so, you need to create a whole new approach. basically, you should try to use lasers, they are cheap and easily available in the first world, don't know about here though. this will send a precise signal, but, let's say that that doesn't go down well with the people issuing grants, what now?

    If you were to observe a computer's motherboard or bus, you will find that it does just this frilly sort of processing and relays. if you were to make each signal unique, like setting the 'binary' to a set value, it will go much faster, but the mold will take some time to develop. then you can specifically set each ting to a certain instruction. this is like having a set place to work in the office - who wants to work on someone else's terminal? it takes too long to set up and change to yours, yes?
    Last edited by Brett Nortje; 06-Jan-15 at 01:58 PM. Reason: Forgot to identify quote source.
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    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    How to manufacture these quickly and cheaply.

    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogue_electronics
    Analogue circuits are typically harder to design, requiring more skill, than comparable digital systems.[citation needed] This is one of the main reasons why digital systems have become more common than analogue devices. An analogue circuit must be designed by hand, and the process is much less automated than for digital systems. However, if a digital electronic device is to interact with the real world, it will always need an analogue interface.[9] For example, every digital radio receiver has an analogue preamplifier as the first stage in the receive chain.
    Well well well, if it isn't that design factor i was talking about? if you are to make it quickly, you need a mold, for analogue systems and products or 'things.' to do this you need to create a robot that puts it together, but you won't be soldering anything, trust me! these systems are very 'sensitive' and react badly to welding.

    So, you need to create a mold that is made out of leather, as plastic and leather stick, but leather will separate from plastic quickly when you want to assemble it. then, you need to program the robot to get the plastic to the right temperature, i would say over boiling point, yet under a temperature that leather can sustain. then, you need to simply pour the plastic into the leather case.

    If leather is a bad choice, and it might be, then you need to use a metal that is not 'sticky,' like copper is sticky and has a low melting point, yes? so, you need to use something like stainless steel! this is used with cooking, so will not stick!
    !! Going to my destruction !!

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    Diamond Member adrianh's Avatar
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    Is this like a private conversation between yourself....it doesn't make much sense!
    How easily someone is offended is directly proportional to how stupid they are.
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    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianh View Post
    Is this like a private conversation between yourself....it doesn't make much sense!
    Just jump in! hope you can add to my ideas, however hopeless you think this might be, you could do it, by hook or by crook!
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    Diamond Member adrianh's Avatar
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    Those are not ideas, they are "random noise"

    If you have an idea then put it on the table, nobody is interested in random waffle!
    How easily someone is offended is directly proportional to how stupid they are.
    ~GS Elevator

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    Diamond Member Justloadit's Avatar
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    Analogue electronics is extremely difficult to master, one of the major problems of analogue as well is switching noise along with temperature drift.

    A simple example is the 50Hz hum on audio amplifiers, if your grounding and wire routing are not perfect, you hear the hum in the loudspeakers affecting the music quality.

    Digital electronics can emulate analogue electronics, and whats more is that the information can be easily stored and reproduced, and it can be sent thousands of kMs away in an instant, not so with analogue. Whilst RF is an analogue source, it is still influenced my outside factors such as connections, weather and obstacles. A good example of this was the use of LW (Long Wave), SW(Short Wave), AM(Amplitude Modulation), in which the information was sent via the amplitude, it was easily interfered with any EMF, such as static, lightning, alternator winning, and even the spark from your petrol engine, where as FM (Frequency modulation) is a combination of digital with analogue. That is the information content is transmitted by varying the frequency and not by the amplitude. This makes it very rugged form of analogue data transfer.

    Unfortunately analogue still plays a major role in electronics today, in that almost all sensors are usually an analogue source, which is then converted into a digital value, to be used by microprocessors and computers. These sensors range from pressure, temperature, magnetic field, heart beat pulse, and many thousands of other sensors.
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    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justloadit View Post
    Analogue electronics is extremely difficult to master, one of the major problems of analogue as well is switching noise along with temperature drift.

    A simple example is the 50Hz hum on audio amplifiers, if your grounding and wire routing are not perfect, you hear the hum in the loudspeakers affecting the music quality.

    Digital electronics can emulate analogue electronics, and whats more is that the information can be easily stored and reproduced, and it can be sent thousands of kMs away in an instant, not so with analogue. Whilst RF is an analogue source, it is still influenced my outside factors such as connections, weather and obstacles. A good example of this was the use of LW (Long Wave), SW(Short Wave), AM(Amplitude Modulation), in which the information was sent via the amplitude, it was easily interfered with any EMF, such as static, lightning, alternator winning, and even the spark from your petrol engine, where as FM (Frequency modulation) is a combination of digital with analogue. That is the information content is transmitted by varying the frequency and not by the amplitude. This makes it very rugged form of analogue data transfer.

    Unfortunately analogue still plays a major role in electronics today, in that almost all sensors are usually an analogue source, which is then converted into a digital value, to be used by microprocessors and computers. These sensors range from pressure, temperature, magnetic field, heart beat pulse, and many thousands of other sensors.
    It is not as stable as analog electronics.
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    Diamond Member adrianh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Nortje View Post
    It is not as stable as analog electronics.
    Please explain what you mean by "stable"
    How easily someone is offended is directly proportional to how stupid they are.
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    Bronze Member Brett Nortje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianh View Post
    Please explain what you mean by "stable"
    Well, if there is a storm, for example...
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