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Thread: Land Re-Distribution - A different approach

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    Land Re-Distribution - A different approach

    The government is embarking on accelerating its land re-distribution programme. They will acquire operating farms from successful farmers and transfer these to new black owners.

    The population of South Africa is growing, not only naturally, but by the movement of people from outside of the borders, in search of a better life.

    Each year as the population grows more demand is placed on the scarce resources of South Africa. Food is a very important scarce resource.

    In any change of ownership and management there is risk of some failure no matter who the new management is. And the more unfamiliar and inexperienced the new management is, the higher the risk becomes. I think that this is common sense.
    It however makes little sense why risks are taken with such a scarce resource when this can be avoided and perhaps even improved.

    I wonder if the government has considered that it owns a tremendous amount of unused arable land. And that some of this land could be developed into productive farming units.
    And that in developing the new land, future owners and managers can gain invaluable insight and experience and also draw on the knowledge of existing experienced farmers and their associations.

    If any of these farming units should fail for any reason whatsoever it will have no effect of the current agricultural output. Some money will however have been lost.
    If an existing productive farming unit fails then the current agricultural output reduces by the amount of the historical output of that unit.
    The two scenarios here both have a direct impact on food security. One presents a positive risk (we could lose that which we did not have as yet) and the other a negative risk (we could lose what we already have).

    By nature I am risk averse so for me and perhaps a good number of other people the obvious choice would be to develop new land and avoid tampering with existing productive farming unity.

    I have been trying to find the downside of new developments as opposed to taking over existing farms. Maybe Iím dof but I donít see any. I see only fair risks with excellent prospects.

    There is however one possibility. In government buying an existing productive farm the new managers and owners instantly become people of standing, black people in charge of a large and successful enterprise. Instant gratification? Yes?
    This can and probably will be used to score political points....and this will be good for the ruling party. This short-sightedness can however place the countryís food security at risk.

    A growing population with a diminishing food supply will lead to higher prices for locally produced food and more money leaving the country for imported food. This means that some people will eat less and some not at all. A hungry population is a volatile and dangerous population.

    One of governmentís primary functions is to ensure that the population has enough food.

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    Blurock (09-Jul-12)

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    Diamond Member Blurock's Avatar
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    If they go ahead with this, the Government will destroy the agriculture industry the same way they have destroyed (or allowed to destroy) the textile and other manufacturing industries. This is due to tenderpreneurs and other corrupt practices allowed by the government.

    From being a net exporter, we will become a net importer. There will eventually be no revenue generating industries left and we will have to rely on printing more money, which leads to more inflation.
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    Diamond Member wynn's Avatar
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    When they buy a farm one of the conditions should be that the farmer remain for 5 years to train the beneficiary so that there is continuation.
    Obviously he will have to be paid a decent salary for the time that he remains for.
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    Diamond Member Blurock's Avatar
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    I agree with wynn. I do not have a problem with the basic concept of transformation, but there has to be some form of training and skills transfer. Owning a farm does not make you a farmer as little as owning a mine makes you a miner.

    The biggest mistake the government and the unions make is to demand privileges and assets that they have not worked for. Without the necessary skills you become as ineffective as the current government.

    Nothing in the world is free. We all have to work to make a living. Do an apprenticeship, learn from your mentors so that one day you can take over and be an effective farmer, miner, manager or candlestick maker.

    There are many successful black people in business, commerce and all walks of life. I read about Bongingkosi Hilton today. He graduated Cum Laude with his National Diploma in Internal Auditing and received a Dean's merit award. This after he slept at a service station the first night in Durban. He overcame hardship and achieved 29 distinctions out of 30! So stop blaming bad education, poverty and apartheid. Stop talking and start doing something.
    Excellence is not a skill; its an attitude...

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