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Thread: multiplugs

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    multiplugs

    whats your views on multiplugs that are secured to the wall. is it regarded as part of the installation? a customer wants his house made compliant for insurance purposes. multiplugs are usually dodgy and can be fire hazards.

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    Diamond Member Blurock's Avatar
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    So how do you know which ones are safe?
    Excellence is not a skill; its an attitude...

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    Site Caretaker Dave A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bergie View Post
    whats your views on multiplugs that are secured to the wall. is it regarded as part of the installation?
    My understanding is if it is plugged in into a plug outlet, it's not part of the installation.

    If it is wired in (something we do come across from time to time) it is part of the installation. In this situation we normally just put them onto a plugtop to get the installation up to compliance...
    The trouble with opportunity is it normally comes dressed up as work.

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    low cost housing is a good example of this type of issue...only the ready board and the plugs mounted in the ready board are regarded as part of the electrical installation...everything plugged into the sockets are "not" part of the elctrical installation.

    i found a multi plug connected directly to the stove isolator...when i listed the multi plug on my inspection report...i was told that it has a thrermal cut out...so i advised them that the wire to the multi plug did not conform and the muti plug had no sabs certificate.

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    Correct, but an exception is for eg a gate motor - new regulation states that it must be isolated either via a circuit breaker or a plug within one metre of the gate motor. The motor is still regarded as part of the installation tho.

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    ok so if the multiplug is plugged in and screwed to the wall, i am covered ,but will the insurance co. moan if the multiplug causes the fire. i would only use sabs approved with thermal cut out.

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    Insurance company will moan anyway ........... Multiplugs dont last that long so shouldnt become a "permanent" fixture anyway.

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    Email problem Missnancyalex's Avatar
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    I think discussion is going worthwhile but I suggest you to ask this question from some insurance company they will brief you.
    Last edited by Missnancyalex; 13-Jan-12 at 09:44 AM.

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    Talking ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinb View Post
    Correct, but an exception is for eg a gate motor - new regulation states that it must be isolated either via a circuit breaker or a plug within one metre of the gate motor. The motor is still regarded as part of the installation tho.



    6.16.5.1.5 Each motor shall be supplied by a manually operated
    disconnector or any other manually operated disconnecting arrangement
    such as a withdrawable circuit-breaker, a removable link, a fuse or by the
    removal of a plug from a socket-outlet, which provides at least the same
    isolating distance, for the sake of safety, as a disconnector that is
    Amdt 3
    a) readily accessible and mounted on or next to the motor, or
    b) visible from the motor, or
    c) lockable in the open position, or
    d) housed in a lockable enclosure other than a distribution board.

    pse point me to the reg that specify "one meter"

    tnx, adam

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    As per what I said.
    We as installers have been on courses and have been told that it has to be within one metre of the motor by electricians and municipal people. Perhaps they are taking the "visible from the motor" clause and just saying one metre. I had an electrician around the other day doing a coc at someones house and he told me the same thing.

    If you look at a and b above which says readily accessible and mounted on or NEXT to the motor or visible from the motor then perhaps around one metre is taken as NEXT to the motor.

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